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hypnotherapy tips
Wellness
Published Tuesday Sep 10, 2019 by Jasmine Smith

What You Need to Know About Hypnotherapy

Personal Growth
Meditation

“Are you going to make me bark like a dog, or quack like a duck?” 

As a hypnotherapist, I hear comments like this all the time. It wouldn’t surprise me if you’ve already jumped to a conclusion about hypnosis yourself. Perhaps you’re convinced it’s woo-hoo, voodoo, and a bunch of hoopla wrapped together to entertain crowds at the county fair.

Technically, you wouldn’t be wrong…people have used the skill of hypnosis to entertain crowds. Mainstream media loves to drive our imagination wild with outrageous storylines. Have you seen “Get Out”? Makes you think twice about drinking tea with anyone. These exaggerated fiction tales make us leery. It’s no wonder most people stay away from hypnosis. Plus it’s our brain’s job to keep us away from the unknown and otherwise seemingly dangerous. We don’t like things we don’t understand. But, it’s also a part of human nature to question what seems invalid. It’s good to question, research, investigate, and come to your own educated decision.

Hypnosis is more than just some weird county-fairground trick. I often describe hypnosis as meditation with a goal while harnessing the power of a mind-body connection.

The thing is, hypnosis has been studied and researched extensively for decades. Award-winning doctor Dr. David Siegel, was exposed to hypnotherapy by his father—a psychiatrist, and a trained Freudian analyst who first experienced hypnosis in World War II to provide aid to soldiers and offer an alternative to anesthesia. The golden child of hypnosis research, Dr. Spiegel is the Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of the Center on Stress and Health, and the  Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He’s legit. He’s even talked with the Dali Lama about how hypnosis relieves pain and depression in cancer patients and how “feelings lead to healing.”Hypnosis has also studied and utilized by well-known psychologists like Carl Jung.
 

So, what the heck is hypnosis? 

Hypnosis is more than just some weird county-fairground trick. I often describe hypnosis as meditation with a goal while harnessing the power of a mind-body connection.

Hypnosis is the act of guiding someone into a state of trance to bring the mind and body into absolute agreement. Although each hypnotherapist may describe trance differently, they can agree on a few key qualities. Trance includes a deep state of relaxation, hyper-focus or intentional concentration, and openness or increased suggestibility. 

 

What is the difference between a hypnotist and hypnotherapy?

A stage hypnotist makes suggestions to evoke an external response from the hypnotized volunteers, to entertain the crowd. A hypnotherapist’s suggestions are intended to create internal changes within the client. The stage bunch is open to performing simple tasks (laughing until you cry, dancing like nobody's watching, etc.) that they otherwise would allow themselves to do in their normal day to day life. They are open to it, the hypnotist suggests it, and in a deeply relaxed state, they react accordingly. “They are not thinking about themselves doing it, they’re just doing it.” It truly is that simple. 

If it sounds too simple, it’s because it is. The truth is, most of us go in and out of trance every day, multiple times a day. It happens when you’re very relaxed or very focused and can feel similar to a daydream like state. Have you ever completely zoned out on your way to work and couldn’t recall how you got there? Could you, without a doubt, retrace every red light, stop sign, or right turn you made? No? It’s because you were in trance. 

The only difference between hypnosis and these everyday trance states is that in hypnosis, someone induces the trance state for a specific reason or goal: healing, pain relief, stress relief, fear of public speaking, or increasing self-esteem, to name a few. The definition of hypnotherapy is clear from the word itself. Hypnotherapy is the practice of hypnosis for therapeutic purposes.

 

What does hypnotherapy actually do? 

Hypnotherapy allows us to communicate directly with the subconscious mind, while letting you be in the driver's seat. The subconscious mind is the part of the brain that is on autopilot, running in the background, a reservoir that holds your ideas, beliefs, and perceptions. The interesting thing is that ninety-five percent of the time, we’re totally unaware of what’s running in the subconscious mind. 

Imagine your mind is like an iPod. When you first get it, there are no programs to run or songs to play; you have to download them first. The mind at birth is like a brand new iPod, ready to download. From birth to about eight years old, your brain is in a theta brain wave, simply recording or downloading. 

Theta is the brain wave we experience during trance and the same brain wave we desire in hypnotherapy. During these first eight years of life, each person is recording the world around him or her and loading the “programs” that we use for the rest of our lives—downloaded and stored in the subconscious mind. These programs are downloaded into our subconscious mind and run in the back of our mind forever. Just like an iPod, we can skip the song or program altogether, but it’s only a matter of time before it comes up again.

The purpose of hypnotherapy is to rewrite those old songs (or programs) you’re tired of and want to skip. When you’re deeply relaxed, open to suggestion, and truly desire that specific goal or outcome in your life, you allow that program to be overwritten. Hypnotherapy can reduce stress, anxiety, or aid you in reaching your specifically desired goals to enhance your life.

If you’re new to hypnotherapy, curious, or want to want to try it out for yourself, download this free deep hypno-meditation

Jasmine Smith MINDBODY
Written by
Jasmine Smith
Yogi | Meditation Teacher
About the author
Jasmine Smith is a spiritual development coach, yogi, meditation teacher, science nerd, essential oil junkie, hypnotherapist, and a former medical assistant. Not one for labels, you may find it difficult to categorize her and she's okay with that. An international teacher and innovative thought leader, Jasmine brings a depth of experience, a fresh perspective, and a new way of being 365 days a year.
healthy-apple-recipes
Wellness
Published Monday Nov 11, 2019 by Sara Lesher

4 Healthy Apple Recipes to Indulge Your Fall Cravings

Food
Recipes
Expert Advice

 

Autumn is the season of apple picking, pumpkin carving, and delicious holiday treats. Whether you’re searching for a delightful morning pick-me-up or your go-to seasonal salad, we’ve found four apple-featuring recipes that are yummy, healthy, and perfect for fall!

Breakfast

 

Cinnamon Apple Breakfast Quinoa

If you think quinoa for breakfast sounds a little strange, trust us, it’s a game-changer. This protein-packed, healthy treat is a great way to start your morning off strong. Not to mention, it’s gluten-free.

 

Photo credit: Simplyquinoa.com
 

1
Breakfast

 

Cinnamon Apple Breakfast Quinoa

If you think quinoa for breakfast sounds a little strange, trust us, it’s a game-changer. This protein-packed, healthy treat is a great way to start your morning off strong. Not to mention, it’s gluten-free.

 

Photo credit: Simplyquinoa.com
 

Lunch

 

Autumn Apple Salad with a Maple Vinaigrette

This salad is packed with so many different flavors, and they work in tasty harmony. It might be called the Autumn Apple Salad, but we want to eat it all year long.

 

Photo credit: Houseofyumm.com

2
Lunch

 

Autumn Apple Salad with a Maple Vinaigrette

This salad is packed with so many different flavors, and they work in tasty harmony. It might be called the Autumn Apple Salad, but we want to eat it all year long.

 

Photo credit: Houseofyumm.com

Dinner

 

Harvest Chicken Skillet with Sweet Potatoes, Brussels Sprouts, and Sautéed Apples

Sweet and savory, paleo and Whole30 approved, cooked in just one pan… ‘nuff said.

 

Photo credit: Wellplated.com
 

3
Dinner

 

Harvest Chicken Skillet with Sweet Potatoes, Brussels Sprouts, and Sautéed Apples

Sweet and savory, paleo and Whole30 approved, cooked in just one pan… ‘nuff said.

 

Photo credit: Wellplated.com
 

Dessert

 

Healthy Vegan Apple Crisp

This dessert is gluten-free, vegan, and delicious. It’s made with salted caramel cashew butter and maple syrup. YUM.

 

Photo credit: Veggiesdontbite.com
 

4
Dessert

 

Healthy Vegan Apple Crisp

This dessert is gluten-free, vegan, and delicious. It’s made with salted caramel cashew butter and maple syrup. YUM.

 

Photo credit: Veggiesdontbite.com
 

Sara Lesher About the Author Headshot
Written by
Sara Lesher
Marketing Content Associate
About the author
Spoiled by the San Diego sunshine, Sara’s hobbies include beaching, hiking, concert-going, and brewery-hopping. As MINDBODY’s Marketing Content Associate, she naturally loves reading and writing… so if you have any book recommendations, let her know. And just between us: she’s committed to health and wellness but loves a good taco (shoutout TJ Tacos in Escondido).