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sleep wellness
Wellness
Published Thursday Mar 08, 2018 by Erica Arvanitis

Our Secrets to a Better Night’s Sleep

Relaxation
Meditation
Motivation

Dedicated to catching quality Zzz’s? For those of us who struggle with getting enough sleep—or snagging deep, dreamy slumber—your next go-to product or tip might be just around the corner. 

We asked around the MINDBODY San Diego, California office and scored eight individually tested tips for Sleep Awareness Week—and every other week of the year. Don’t worry, we’re professional nappers.

 

Tap into restful sleep 

“While it can be essential to unplug before bed, I find what works best for me is utilizing my phone. No scrolling mindlessly through Instagram or checking your Pinterest, I’m talking meditation apps. If I’m having a hard time falling asleep, I tap my Simple Habit app and there are tons of meditations tailored to whatever my drift-off dilemma may be. Personally, I love the “Sleep Therapy” session—it’ll send you right to sleep.”  
- Erica A., Copywriter 

 

tea

Quali-tea shuteye

“I drink herbal tea about an hour before bed and about 30 minutes before bed, I put lavender oil in my aromatherapy diffuser. The brews that send me straight to sleep are 40 Winks Tea, Foxtrot Tea, and Chamomile Lavender Tea!”
- Marie Z., Product Manager 

 

silk sheets

Get your beauty sleep 

“Sleeping on comfortable materials are linked to helping you fall asleep faster—therefore silk pillowcases are completely necessary in the sleep process. There is no better feeling then the soft, smooth and luxurious feel of silk against your skin when you go to bed. It’s the perfect way to end your day and slip you into the night (see what I did there?). It is truly like having a facial, massage and hair blow out every night.”
- Devin D., Marketing Communications Specialist


Achieve snooze status with a sleep aid 

“One word, four syllables: Mel-a-to-nin! I take 2-4mg a few minutes before getting in bed. 15-20 minutes later I can’t keep my eyes open. I sleep like a baby and don’t have a melatonin hangover in the morning.”
- Ryan K., Data Analyst 

 

essential oil
Shuteye the self-care way 

“A little self-care and reading before bed is what helps me sleep best. I love turning on my essential oil diffuser and adding some lavender essential oil—lavender has such a calming scent and it helps me relax. Then I’ll put on a face mask (I usually use a charcoal mask, or moisturizing mask if my skin is dry); and read a good book while the mask sets. Reading puts me to sleep better than anything and it’s a great way to disconnect from all of the week’s obligations.”
- Hanna H., Dynamic Pricing Specialist


Reset your rhythm 

“I think the most impactful thing I do to have a restful night’s sleep is honor the transition time between my daily work, social activities and my night. Before I enter my house I like to take a short walk around the block to reset. If it’s too late or the weather is bad I’ll simply pause in my car for a minute to take a few deep breaths, reflect on my day and clear my mind, before entering the house.”
- Laurenn C., Marketing, Consumer Products

 

bath self care
Give yourself a siesta-level spa night 

“After a long stressful day, I always sleep better after a hot bath or shower before bed. For extra REMs, throw in some calming bath salts and a candle or two. Don’t have time for a bath? Use some essential oil lavender body wash and pretend you're decompressing at your favorite spa.”
- Natalie E., Product Manager 

 
CALM your body before bed 

“I take a few sips of CALM—Calcium Magnesium—and that truly calms me down, letting me drift away to a better night’s sleep. I always turn my diffuser on for some lavender/eucalyptus smells, plus it’s a nice white noise. Lastly, I always try and put my phone away and read at least a few pages of a book—I usually knock out after the first few paragraphs.”
- Keana N., Consumer Products Marketing Manager

 

Whether you’re a night owl or early bird, fall asleep fast—and stay that way until you hit the snooze button—by trying one of these daily habits from our MINDBODY slumber gurus! 
 

Erica Arvanitis MINDBODY
Written by
Erica Arvanitis
Copywriter
About the author
A copywriter by day, Erica spends her free time mastering the art of puzzles while forcing her 10-year-old Chow mix to wear sweaters. With experience in PR, social media, marketing, and copywriting, Erica lives and breathes the written word. Warning: don’t test her on Friends trivia - she will win every time.
Yoga sleep tips MINDBODY
Wellness
Published Wednesday Sep 18, 2019 by Amber Scriven

4 Yoga Poses for a Better Night’s Sleep

Yoga
Personal Growth
Expert Advice

We’ve all had sleepless nights. It’s the worst! Watching the wee hours of morning tick away. Wishing we could slip into a restful sleep before our alarm goes off . The frustrating feeling of knowing exactly how many minutes there are before you need to be up. Then, struggling through a heavy relentless morning filled with self-medicating coffee runs, and a tired, snappy version of yourself dragging through the day. 

There’s no one miracle cure for insomnia because there are so many reasons for not being able to sleep. Many people, however, find relief by curbing stress right before bed. One way to do that is with a few choice yoga stretches that mellow you out by encouraging your Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) to ignite your bodies “rest and digest” cycles. This is the opposite of the “fight or flight” system that helps you race away from oncoming tigers, or other more urban “dangers.”  

Here are a few shapes that calm the nervous system and decrease adrenaline in the body to help you rest and ultimately sleep better. 
 

Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

1
Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

2
Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

3
Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

4
Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

Amber Scriven Acupuncturist
Written by
Amber Scriven
Acupuncturist | Yoga Teacher
About the author
A busy acupuncturist, yoga teacher and trainer, Amber has actively worked in the wellness industry for over 10 years. For her, yoga is a form of health care that she uses alongside acupuncture in the form of retreats, injury rehabilitation, and pain relief. Amber is renowned for building emotional strength while cultivating physical health.