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Natural Deodorant - MINDBODY
Wellness
Published Monday Aug 12, 2019 by Paula Hoss

4 Tips on Finding (and Using) Natural Deodorant

Personal Growth
Expert Advice

If you’ve been around the wellness community for an asana or two, you’ve probably heard the buzz about natural deodorants.
 
However, even though many of us know that it’s important to seek out natural alternatives in our personal care, sometimes making the switch can be daunting or downright stinky.
 
The great news is that natural deodorants have come a long way in the past few years. You no longer need to compromise between feeling “hand-raising ready” and choosing a safe choice for your body and the environment.


What is the difference between conventional antiperspirants and natural deodorants?

Most antiperspirants, including the ones that your mom likely slid onto your shelves right after you had “the talk,” are formulated with aluminum and synthetic fragrances. Aluminum blocks the sweat glands in your armpits and synthetic fragrances mask odors caused by the growth of bacteria.
 
The bad news? Your armpits were made to sweat and purge toxins. When your body’s sweat glands are blocked, those toxins stay in your body and can lead to potential health complications.
 
The great news? The wellness community has been heard loud and clear, and there are now several alternative deodorants to choose from. Compared to antiperspirants, natural deodorants replace aluminum with natural moisture-absorbing ingredients and synthetic fragrances with essential oils (look for bacterial blasting tea tree).
 
Here’s a few tips for finding (and using) natural deodorants!

Prepare for a detox period.

Depending on your body chemistry, you can expect a 2-4 week detox period while your body gets used to living without an antiperspirant.

During this time, you may want to carry around your natural deodorant and touch up a few times a day, use a sauna to increase detoxification, and wash with antibacterial soap to keep stick causing bacteria at bay.

Try: Pacifica - Coconut & Charcoal Underarm Detox Scrub, $15

1
Prepare for a detox period.

Depending on your body chemistry, you can expect a 2-4 week detox period while your body gets used to living without an antiperspirant.

During this time, you may want to carry around your natural deodorant and touch up a few times a day, use a sauna to increase detoxification, and wash with antibacterial soap to keep stick causing bacteria at bay.

Try: Pacifica - Coconut & Charcoal Underarm Detox Scrub, $15

Look for deodorants with natural ingredients.

When looking at labels, aim to get as close to 100% natural ingredients as possible.

Look for plant-derived ingredients and natural clays and steer clear of aluminum, synthetic fragrances, and BHT (aka butylated hydroxytoluene, a cosmetic preservative).

Try: CORPUS N⁰ Green Natural Deodorant, $22

2
Look for deodorants with natural ingredients.

When looking at labels, aim to get as close to 100% natural ingredients as possible.

Look for plant-derived ingredients and natural clays and steer clear of aluminum, synthetic fragrances, and BHT (aka butylated hydroxytoluene, a cosmetic preservative).

Try: CORPUS N⁰ Green Natural Deodorant, $22

Adjust your products for sensitive skin.

Many people complain that natural deodorants give them a rash or irritate their underarms. This is generally because many natural deodorants use baking soda as an ingredient to aid in absorbing moisture. Baking soda can be effective for keeping sweat at bay; however, it’s also quite abrasive (think: baking soda based toothpaste and home cleaning products).

If you tend to have sensitive skin, seek out deodorants that have arrowroot powder or kaolin clay.

Try: CLN&DRTY Natural Skincare Lemon Eucalyptus Natural Deodorant,  $16

3
Adjust your products for sensitive skin.

Many people complain that natural deodorants give them a rash or irritate their underarms. This is generally because many natural deodorants use baking soda as an ingredient to aid in absorbing moisture. Baking soda can be effective for keeping sweat at bay; however, it’s also quite abrasive (think: baking soda based toothpaste and home cleaning products).

If you tend to have sensitive skin, seek out deodorants that have arrowroot powder or kaolin clay.

Try: CLN&DRTY Natural Skincare Lemon Eucalyptus Natural Deodorant,  $16

If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.

Don’t be shy to try a few natural deodorants until you find one that’s good for you. Test out a few different brands, scents, and ingredient profiles before throwing the towel in. And remember to give yourself the full 30 days to detox from aluminum and other chemicals.

Switching over to natural products can be overwhelming, so we encourage you to remember that it’s all about progress and not perfection.
 
Consider transitioning to one “clean” product per month rather than throwing out your entire medicine cabinet and starting from scratch. And remember, the natural personal care industry has grown so much in the past few years. You no longer have to compromise between being healthy and loving your personal care products!

Want to learn more about natural skincare? Discover tips, new products, and more at CLN&DRTY or follow @clnanddrty
 

4
If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.

Don’t be shy to try a few natural deodorants until you find one that’s good for you. Test out a few different brands, scents, and ingredient profiles before throwing the towel in. And remember to give yourself the full 30 days to detox from aluminum and other chemicals.

Switching over to natural products can be overwhelming, so we encourage you to remember that it’s all about progress and not perfection.
 
Consider transitioning to one “clean” product per month rather than throwing out your entire medicine cabinet and starting from scratch. And remember, the natural personal care industry has grown so much in the past few years. You no longer have to compromise between being healthy and loving your personal care products!

Want to learn more about natural skincare? Discover tips, new products, and more at CLN&DRTY or follow @clnanddrty
 

Paula Hoss
Written by
Paula Hoss
Founder | CLN&DRTY Natural Skincare
About the author
The founder of CLN&DRTY Natural Skincare, Paula Hoss is a mental health and substance abuse recovery advocate. Featured in Beauty Independent and Brit + Co, she lives in Massachusetts with her husband, two children, and a flock of chickens.
intuitive eating tips
Wellness
Published Tuesday Oct 22, 2019 by Connie Weissmuller

5 Things You Might Not Know About Intuitive Eating

Nutrition
Food
Expert Advice

Intuitive eating is an approach to eating that has nothing to do with diets, “lifestyle changes,” cleanses, or anything of the sort. It is a powerful way of giving trust and peace back to your body and mind, likely after a time of giving that trust up to external means of control such as using apps to count calories and steps, or intentionally trying to manipulate your body size. 

Intuitive eating, in its truest sense, is supportive of one’s mental, emotional, and physical health. However, as diet and wellness culture have co-opted the term, there has been some misinformation that actually isn’t in line with intuitive eating at all. As a Registered Dietitian and nutrition expert, I’m here to hopefully clear up some blurry lines and share with you some ways to get accurate information about intuitive eating.

If you see someone promoting intuitive eating as a means for intentional weight loss—run!

Here’s the thing; intuitive eating isn’t used for weight loss. Weight change may be an outcome of intuitive eating, but we have no idea whether that means an increase, decrease, or no change in weight. If someone is promoting intuitive eating as an explicit weight loss, slim down, or detox strategythat’s a red flag.

This is why many intuitive eating informed dietitians, counselors, and therapists suggest ditching the scale. The scale doesn’t tell you how well you are eating intuitively, and it certainly doesn’t give you helpful information regarding your health. At the end of the day, intuitive eating helps you move towards a healthy weight that is right for you. That’s also called your set point weight. It’s different for everyone. Intuitive eating is the nutrition paradigm supported by the larger paradigm of Health At Every Size, which respects body diversity, challenges scientific and cultural assumptions related to body size, and encourages finding joy in moving one’s body. There’s so much nuance, which is why there is value in working with a professional well-versed in intuitive eating and Health At Every Size

1
If you see someone promoting intuitive eating as a means for intentional weight loss—run!

Here’s the thing; intuitive eating isn’t used for weight loss. Weight change may be an outcome of intuitive eating, but we have no idea whether that means an increase, decrease, or no change in weight. If someone is promoting intuitive eating as an explicit weight loss, slim down, or detox strategythat’s a red flag.

This is why many intuitive eating informed dietitians, counselors, and therapists suggest ditching the scale. The scale doesn’t tell you how well you are eating intuitively, and it certainly doesn’t give you helpful information regarding your health. At the end of the day, intuitive eating helps you move towards a healthy weight that is right for you. That’s also called your set point weight. It’s different for everyone. Intuitive eating is the nutrition paradigm supported by the larger paradigm of Health At Every Size, which respects body diversity, challenges scientific and cultural assumptions related to body size, and encourages finding joy in moving one’s body. There’s so much nuance, which is why there is value in working with a professional well-versed in intuitive eating and Health At Every Size

It’s not just the hunger and fullness diet; there is so much nuance!

Often times, intuitive eating gets the most attention from “honoring hunger and fullness,” which is a huge part of intuitive eating, however; it’s not that simple. There are plenty of instances I can think of within myself, or with my clients in eating disorder and chronic dieting recovery, where you simply don’t get appropriate hunger and fullness cues.

Your body sends amazing signals when it needs nourishment, yet the culture we live in tells us that those innate signals can't be trusted. This can lead to diminished hunger and fullness cues from dieting, skipping meals, or following the bogus rule of no eating after 7 pm. This is where working with a professional to gain back appropriate cues is helpful. 

Sometimes we have to eat when we aren't hungry just for the simple reason that we need energy and nourishment. This can be uncomfortable. For example, before exams and presentations, while I was in school, I had no appetite, but I knew that my brain needed fuel. I practiced the gentle nutrition piece of intuitive eating and ate anyways to perform my best academically. This is just one example where it’s not merely honoring hunger and fullness. 

3
It’s not just the hunger and fullness diet; there is so much nuance!

Often times, intuitive eating gets the most attention from “honoring hunger and fullness,” which is a huge part of intuitive eating, however; it’s not that simple. There are plenty of instances I can think of within myself, or with my clients in eating disorder and chronic dieting recovery, where you simply don’t get appropriate hunger and fullness cues.

Your body sends amazing signals when it needs nourishment, yet the culture we live in tells us that those innate signals can't be trusted. This can lead to diminished hunger and fullness cues from dieting, skipping meals, or following the bogus rule of no eating after 7 pm. This is where working with a professional to gain back appropriate cues is helpful. 

Sometimes we have to eat when we aren't hungry just for the simple reason that we need energy and nourishment. This can be uncomfortable. For example, before exams and presentations, while I was in school, I had no appetite, but I knew that my brain needed fuel. I practiced the gentle nutrition piece of intuitive eating and ate anyways to perform my best academically. This is just one example where it’s not merely honoring hunger and fullness. 

It’s not just about eating donuts all day.

Another common misconception is that intuitive eating is all about fun food all the time. The truth is that yes, in order to make peace with all foods, there’s often a “honeymoon” phase, if you will, with certain foods that have been off-limits. Those foods are typically deemed “bad” in our culture, so that’s why you might see more photos of those on Instagram to normalize them. After that honeymoon phase, all foods are fair game, and there’s eventually a great balance in the diet of fuel food and fun foods. Fun foods, like donuts, get old after a while when there are no restrictions (mental or physical) around them, so that’s why intuitive eaters have no moral dilemma when presented with a donut. They eat it, or they don’t because they know that donuts are fair game whenever the craving hits. 

4
It’s not just about eating donuts all day.

Another common misconception is that intuitive eating is all about fun food all the time. The truth is that yes, in order to make peace with all foods, there’s often a “honeymoon” phase, if you will, with certain foods that have been off-limits. Those foods are typically deemed “bad” in our culture, so that’s why you might see more photos of those on Instagram to normalize them. After that honeymoon phase, all foods are fair game, and there’s eventually a great balance in the diet of fuel food and fun foods. Fun foods, like donuts, get old after a while when there are no restrictions (mental or physical) around them, so that’s why intuitive eaters have no moral dilemma when presented with a donut. They eat it, or they don’t because they know that donuts are fair game whenever the craving hits. 

It’s a process, and it takes time.

The last big misconception is the notion that you can become an intuitive eater overnight. Tapping back into your body’s innate intuitive nature takes time. Just learning to re-trust my fullness cues took me what I think was about half a year. Finding joy and peace in moving my body took so much longer after years of using exercise as punishment or to manipulate my body shape and size. It takes time to release the mental rules and rigidity around eating. It takes time for your body shape and size to fall at the range that’s right for you. It takes time to appreciate size diversity and maybe even grieve the loss of the body you had when dieting or restricting. This process can take years, and it’s imperative to give yourself a whole lot of self-compassion and grace, because you are surrounded by a culture that tells you dieting is the norm. It’s hard to swim upstream, but I promise you, it’s a lot more peaceful than living in diet culture. 

Feel free to follow and reach out to me on Instagram at @constancelyeating or if you would like to work with me in-person in Denver, or virtually, check out Nourished With Hannah to learn more about Hannah and me! 
 

5
It’s a process, and it takes time.

The last big misconception is the notion that you can become an intuitive eater overnight. Tapping back into your body’s innate intuitive nature takes time. Just learning to re-trust my fullness cues took me what I think was about half a year. Finding joy and peace in moving my body took so much longer after years of using exercise as punishment or to manipulate my body shape and size. It takes time to release the mental rules and rigidity around eating. It takes time for your body shape and size to fall at the range that’s right for you. It takes time to appreciate size diversity and maybe even grieve the loss of the body you had when dieting or restricting. This process can take years, and it’s imperative to give yourself a whole lot of self-compassion and grace, because you are surrounded by a culture that tells you dieting is the norm. It’s hard to swim upstream, but I promise you, it’s a lot more peaceful than living in diet culture. 

Feel free to follow and reach out to me on Instagram at @constancelyeating or if you would like to work with me in-person in Denver, or virtually, check out Nourished With Hannah to learn more about Hannah and me! 
 

Connie Weissmuller MINDBODY
Written by
Connie Weissmuller
Registered Dietitian
About the author
A registered dietitian who loves helping people achieve food and body freedom, Connie specializes in the treatment of eating disorders, intuitive eating, and body image from a Health At Every Size lens. Working with clients to overcome food and body struggles, she is all about giving you the tools you need to find what healthy means to you.