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No Diet Day
Wellness
Published Thursday May 03, 2018 by Erica Fowler

Meet the Nutritionist Who Ditched Her Diet

Nutrition
Expert Advice
Food

What we eat and how we feel are very closely related. The way we consume food has deep emotional roots. I came to this realization in my early twenties when I found myself combating anxiety and weight loss. The highs, the lows—my feelings influenced what I ate. No matter my food choices, I was in a continual anxious mental state, not allowing my body to digest and absorb nutrients properly. 

Then I made a shift. Instead of just eating to eat without much thought of what I was consuming and where it came from, I began to take a conscious intuitive approach with food. “What actually makes me feel good and gives me energy?” Changing what I ate and my thought process, in general, was a huge puzzle piece in healing—and essentially—eliminating my anxiety.
 

No Diet Day


 With that being said, diets scream “one size fits all” to me. We know that isn't the case. The culture of crash diets and fads are seldom long-lasting. It’s time to stop body shaming and trying to look like someone else. What matters most is eating nourishing foods to feel good and being the best version of ourselves we can be! It’s about how you feel on the inside, how you are sleeping, and the energy you get from your meals.  

I have learned to live by an intuitive eating lifestyle. With a base of healthy foods that I consume throughout the week, I also allow flexibility to support my mind and body in the present moment. It’s all about listening to your body.
 

No Diet Day


If I feel like coffee is too much, I want a huge salad for lunch, or that I haven't eaten out in a while and pizza sounds amazing, being conscious and checking in with yourself is the cornerstone to intuitive eating. It’s about being your own friend! Self-awareness is essential when we are emotionally eating—maybe even take a few minutes to stretch, meditate and revisit your food choices after taking a step away!
 
Some tips I use and that I give to my clients to practice eating intuitively in everyday life is first and foremost, to check in with yourself and how you feel. 


“I feel tired, bloated, anxious, etc.” or “energized, productive, and happy.” 


With these thoughts, create a plan to support you and what you want to eat that day. Intuitive eating in a healthy way means that you eat until you are full! Yeah, you read that right. Full. If you are eating healthy, nourishing whole foods, there is no need to restrict your diet in fear of counting calories. I am a firm believer that you should never stay hungry in hopes to lose weight. The true purpose of food is to feed your body and soul all the good stuff, to feel good–for you.  

Erica Fowler
Written by
Erica Fowler
Contributor | Holistic Nutritionist
About the author
With a heart-filled passion for holistic living and people, Erica spends most her time in Southern California along the salty coast when she’s not traveling. Focused on helping her clients find a natural balance, Erica encourages them to thrive through delicious, simple recipes and healthy habits.
Yoga sleep tips MINDBODY
Wellness
Published Wednesday Sep 18, 2019 by Amber Scriven

4 Yoga Poses for a Better Night’s Sleep

Yoga
Personal Growth
Expert Advice

We’ve all had sleepless nights. It’s the worst! Watching the wee hours of morning tick away. Wishing we could slip into a restful sleep before our alarm goes off . The frustrating feeling of knowing exactly how many minutes there are before you need to be up. Then, struggling through a heavy relentless morning filled with self-medicating coffee runs, and a tired, snappy version of yourself dragging through the day. 

There’s no one miracle cure for insomnia because there are so many reasons for not being able to sleep. Many people, however, find relief by curbing stress right before bed. One way to do that is with a few choice yoga stretches that mellow you out by encouraging your Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) to ignite your bodies “rest and digest” cycles. This is the opposite of the “fight or flight” system that helps you race away from oncoming tigers, or other more urban “dangers.”  

Here are a few shapes that calm the nervous system and decrease adrenaline in the body to help you rest and ultimately sleep better. 
 

Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

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Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

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Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

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Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

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Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

Amber Scriven Acupuncturist
Written by
Amber Scriven
Acupuncturist | Yoga Teacher
About the author
A busy acupuncturist, yoga teacher and trainer, Amber has actively worked in the wellness industry for over 10 years. For her, yoga is a form of health care that she uses alongside acupuncture in the form of retreats, injury rehabilitation, and pain relief. Amber is renowned for building emotional strength while cultivating physical health.