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The How-to on Heated Classes
Wellness
Published Tuesday Sep 05, 2017 by Alissa Rogers

The How-to on Heated Classes

Yoga

As the weather gets cooler in some places, many health and fitness enthusiasts are looking to turn the heat up on their yoga and fitness routines—literally. From yoga and barre to Spin® and HIIT, heated classes are quickly becoming a norm for businesses to offer. Interested in trying out a hot class for yourself? Here are some things to know before you arrive:

H 2 (whoa!)

When it comes to heat, hydration is key. Start drinking water a few hours before class so you don’t feel faint or dizzy during your workout. But don’t drink too much too soon—drinking tons of water right before and during class will likely give you a stomachache. Stick to small sips when you feel like you need it, and save the chugging for a replenishing reward after class.

Bring a towel

This might seem like a no-brainer, but you’ll definitely want a towel (or two) on hand for the heat. For mat classes, it’s usually ideal to have one on your mat so you don’t slip and a smaller one to towel yourself off with. For other classes, you may only need a hand towel to help you cool off during breaks.

Dress for success

While your baggy shorts and t-shirt may be great for running or a gym workout, they can get in the way during a heated class. Form-fitting, breathable clothing is recommended—it won’t inhibit your movement and can help wick sweat. What you should wear differs for each person and class, so try to pick what you’ll feel the most comfortable getting really sweaty in.

Don’t eat beforehand

As with drinking water, eating a lot right before class is more harmful than helpful. The heat can be overwhelming and may make you feel like you might throw up, especially during your first few classes. Try not to eat less than two hours before class, so those nauseous feelings don’t turn into actions. If you do need to eat something, grab some small snacks like crackers or fruit. But don’t forget to keep drinking water with them, too!

Arrive with plenty of time

Make sure you get to your first class early enough for your body to acclimate to the heat. Running in at the last minute and just jumping in can be a shock for your body, not to mention stressful when trying something new. Aim to arrive at least 15 minutes ahead of time. That way, you can go in before class, ask the instructor any questions you have, start adjusting to the temperature and warm up your body.

Scope the cool spots

Most heated rooms have certain spots that are hotter than others. If you’re nervous about your first time, don’t be afraid to ask the instructor where the cooler spots are in the room. You can hang out in those for a bit, and then maybe take it up a notch after a few classes by trying the hot spots.

Listen to your body

Heated classes can be intense—one of the most important things to remember is to listen to your body. There’s no shame in taking a break or easing off some of the movements if you feel like you need to. When it comes down to it, you know what is best for your body and what you’re capable of in that moment. The heat is already adding an element of difficulty, so don’t push yourself beyond what’s right for you.

Embrace the sweat

I’ll be the first to admit: I sweat a LOT. Then add a little heat to my classes and I’m guaranteed to win “most likely to need a shower ASAP.” But the whole point of heated classes is to bring on the sweat, so if you’re like me and look like you just went swimming after class, that’s perfectly okay. Embrace your sweaty self and recognize the positive change that you’re making in your life. Don’t worry or compare yourself to that person next to you who looks like they never broke a sweat. Everyone is different, and the feeling you’ll get once you step outside the room after a heated class is one of the best.

Alissa Rogers
Written by
Alissa Rogers
Senior Copywriter
About the author
At MINDBODY, Alissa works on things like ad campaigns, emails, nurture drips, and direct mail campaigns. A California native, she loves being anywhere near a coast. In her free time, Alissa enjoys In-N-Out and yoga (balance), reading, and taking long walks through every aisle at Target.
Yoga sleep tips MINDBODY
Wellness
Published Wednesday Sep 18, 2019 by Amber Scriven

4 Yoga Poses for a Better Night’s Sleep

Yoga
Personal Growth
Expert Advice

We’ve all had sleepless nights. It’s the worst! Watching the wee hours of morning tick away. Wishing we could slip into a restful sleep before our alarm goes off . The frustrating feeling of knowing exactly how many minutes there are before you need to be up. Then, struggling through a heavy relentless morning filled with self-medicating coffee runs, and a tired, snappy version of yourself dragging through the day. 

There’s no one miracle cure for insomnia because there are so many reasons for not being able to sleep. Many people, however, find relief by curbing stress right before bed. One way to do that is with a few choice yoga stretches that mellow you out by encouraging your Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) to ignite your bodies “rest and digest” cycles. This is the opposite of the “fight or flight” system that helps you race away from oncoming tigers, or other more urban “dangers.”  

Here are a few shapes that calm the nervous system and decrease adrenaline in the body to help you rest and ultimately sleep better. 
 

Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

1
Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

2
Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

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Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

4
Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

Amber Scriven Acupuncturist
Written by
Amber Scriven
Acupuncturist | Yoga Teacher
About the author
A busy acupuncturist, yoga teacher and trainer, Amber has actively worked in the wellness industry for over 10 years. For her, yoga is a form of health care that she uses alongside acupuncture in the form of retreats, injury rehabilitation, and pain relief. Amber is renowned for building emotional strength while cultivating physical health.