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denver local wellness yoga
Wellness
Published Friday Mar 01, 2019 by Ashley Tracey

Here’s How to *Successfully* Survive March’s Mercury Retrograde

Yoga
Personal Growth

You kicked off 2019 full steam ahead! January and February were all about getting clear on your intentions and working towards your goals with unwavering ambition. Now, as we enter a new month with Mercury retrograde in our spiritual wheelhouse, you are being asked to slow down a bit and reconnect with your inner world. 

Wait, did someone say slow down? You heard (or read) me right. March is your time to rest, reflect, and refresh. Just as an effective fitness regimen calls for rest days in order to gain the most from your physical workouts, so does your mind. 

How can Mercury retrograde give your mental being that much-needed rest day? Mercury—the planet that rules your mind—goes into retrograde in the sign of Pisces throughout the month of March. This is when you need to take a step back in order to stay aligned with your 2019 intentions. Think of this month as your personal check-in time for your mind, body, and soul. 

If you’re not sure where to start, here are some of my favorite tips and spots around Denver to help you embrace rest—and this month’s retrograde: 

 

It’s all about the Yin.

Yin Yoga is the complement to the traditional vinyasa style “flow” yoga we love so much. It is a more meditative approach to yoga in which you are holding restorative poses for longer periods of time to release the tension in your mind and body. Try an evening Yin Yoga class at Karma Yoga. Or if you can’t yet break away from the flow, try a Vin-Yin class at Oasis—which infuses both a vinyasa and yin style class in 60 relaxing minutes.

 

Watch your worries float away. 

When your mind is overstimulated your ability to relax and stabilize your emotions does not function effectively. That can create a “flight or fight” response to even the smallest trigger. Denver traffic, maybe? In order to break this mental-emotional pattern, you must reduce the amount of stimulation around you and focus on stillness. For ultimate calm, try a float tank session at A New Spirit, where you can learn about (and experience) a revolutionary scientific approach to deep relaxation called Restricted Environmental Stimulation Technique (or R.E.S.T.).  If floating isn’t your thing, try VibroAcoustic Sound Therapy (VAT) at Vive Float Studio. This innovative approach to reducing stress uses mild sound and gentle vibrations to create harmony within the mind and body so that you may ease into a deep meditative space. 

 

I “needle” a bit of peace in my life.

Many of you are hustling these days—hustling to achieve your goals, to grow your business, expand your network, or just taking care of your daily responsibilities. But, as you know, when you hustle too much you can compromise your diet, your immune system, and your well-being. Give yourself a real rest with an acupuncture session at Harmony Healing. Acupuncture uses specific points along the meridians of your body to enhance your recuperative power and immunity, support your physical and emotional health, and improve your overall function. I use acupuncture monthly to keep my hustle in check! 

 

Treat yourself.

...to a massage that is! The benefits of getting a massage can’t be ignored, but many of you are not getting them on the regular. Well, this is the month to treat yourself and get one (or maybe three). Take the time to truly enjoy the hands-on healing that comes with a massage. My favorites? The ah-mazing Aromatherapy Massage w/ Paavani Body Oils at White Lotus Therapeutics. Or the Balinese Massage at Botanica Wellness, which combines acupressure, skin rolling, kneading and percussion. Either way, you can’t go wrong! 


Whatever modality appeals to you, do that this month. Find the time to slow down and reconnect with every element of your being, especially during Mercury retrograde. Take that much-needed break so when April comes around, you will have a renewed sense of direction and passion for your life, your goals, and yourself.
 

Ashley Tracey
Written by
Ashley Tracey
Astrologer | Empowerment Coach
About the author
An all-around spiritual badass based in Denver, Colorado, Ashley Tracey is a passionate and empathetic soul whose life purpose is to help others live at their highest potential. Working with clients around the world to empower wholistic well-being, she helps to expand their consciousness and activate soul-centered living.
intuitive eating tips
Wellness
Published Tuesday Oct 22, 2019 by Connie Weissmuller

5 Things You Might Not Know About Intuitive Eating

Nutrition
Food
Expert Advice

Intuitive eating is an approach to eating that has nothing to do with diets, “lifestyle changes,” cleanses, or anything of the sort. It is a powerful way of giving trust and peace back to your body and mind, likely after a time of giving that trust up to external means of control such as using apps to count calories and steps, or intentionally trying to manipulate your body size. 

Intuitive eating, in its truest sense, is supportive of one’s mental, emotional, and physical health. However, as diet and wellness culture have co-opted the term, there has been some misinformation that actually isn’t in line with intuitive eating at all. As a Registered Dietitian and nutrition expert, I’m here to hopefully clear up some blurry lines and share with you some ways to get accurate information about intuitive eating.

If you see someone promoting intuitive eating as a means for intentional weight loss—run!

Here’s the thing; intuitive eating isn’t used for weight loss. Weight change may be an outcome of intuitive eating, but we have no idea whether that means an increase, decrease, or no change in weight. If someone is promoting intuitive eating as an explicit weight loss, slim down, or detox strategythat’s a red flag.

This is why many intuitive eating informed dietitians, counselors, and therapists suggest ditching the scale. The scale doesn’t tell you how well you are eating intuitively, and it certainly doesn’t give you helpful information regarding your health. At the end of the day, intuitive eating helps you move towards a healthy weight that is right for you. That’s also called your set point weight. It’s different for everyone. Intuitive eating is the nutrition paradigm supported by the larger paradigm of Health At Every Size, which respects body diversity, challenges scientific and cultural assumptions related to body size, and encourages finding joy in moving one’s body. There’s so much nuance, which is why there is value in working with a professional well-versed in intuitive eating and Health At Every Size

1
If you see someone promoting intuitive eating as a means for intentional weight loss—run!

Here’s the thing; intuitive eating isn’t used for weight loss. Weight change may be an outcome of intuitive eating, but we have no idea whether that means an increase, decrease, or no change in weight. If someone is promoting intuitive eating as an explicit weight loss, slim down, or detox strategythat’s a red flag.

This is why many intuitive eating informed dietitians, counselors, and therapists suggest ditching the scale. The scale doesn’t tell you how well you are eating intuitively, and it certainly doesn’t give you helpful information regarding your health. At the end of the day, intuitive eating helps you move towards a healthy weight that is right for you. That’s also called your set point weight. It’s different for everyone. Intuitive eating is the nutrition paradigm supported by the larger paradigm of Health At Every Size, which respects body diversity, challenges scientific and cultural assumptions related to body size, and encourages finding joy in moving one’s body. There’s so much nuance, which is why there is value in working with a professional well-versed in intuitive eating and Health At Every Size

It’s not just the hunger and fullness diet; there is so much nuance!

Often times, intuitive eating gets the most attention from “honoring hunger and fullness,” which is a huge part of intuitive eating, however; it’s not that simple. There are plenty of instances I can think of within myself, or with my clients in eating disorder and chronic dieting recovery, where you simply don’t get appropriate hunger and fullness cues.

Your body sends amazing signals when it needs nourishment, yet the culture we live in tells us that those innate signals can't be trusted. This can lead to diminished hunger and fullness cues from dieting, skipping meals, or following the bogus rule of no eating after 7 pm. This is where working with a professional to gain back appropriate cues is helpful. 

Sometimes we have to eat when we aren't hungry just for the simple reason that we need energy and nourishment. This can be uncomfortable. For example, before exams and presentations, while I was in school, I had no appetite, but I knew that my brain needed fuel. I practiced the gentle nutrition piece of intuitive eating and ate anyways to perform my best academically. This is just one example where it’s not merely honoring hunger and fullness. 

3
It’s not just the hunger and fullness diet; there is so much nuance!

Often times, intuitive eating gets the most attention from “honoring hunger and fullness,” which is a huge part of intuitive eating, however; it’s not that simple. There are plenty of instances I can think of within myself, or with my clients in eating disorder and chronic dieting recovery, where you simply don’t get appropriate hunger and fullness cues.

Your body sends amazing signals when it needs nourishment, yet the culture we live in tells us that those innate signals can't be trusted. This can lead to diminished hunger and fullness cues from dieting, skipping meals, or following the bogus rule of no eating after 7 pm. This is where working with a professional to gain back appropriate cues is helpful. 

Sometimes we have to eat when we aren't hungry just for the simple reason that we need energy and nourishment. This can be uncomfortable. For example, before exams and presentations, while I was in school, I had no appetite, but I knew that my brain needed fuel. I practiced the gentle nutrition piece of intuitive eating and ate anyways to perform my best academically. This is just one example where it’s not merely honoring hunger and fullness. 

It’s not just about eating donuts all day.

Another common misconception is that intuitive eating is all about fun food all the time. The truth is that yes, in order to make peace with all foods, there’s often a “honeymoon” phase, if you will, with certain foods that have been off-limits. Those foods are typically deemed “bad” in our culture, so that’s why you might see more photos of those on Instagram to normalize them. After that honeymoon phase, all foods are fair game, and there’s eventually a great balance in the diet of fuel food and fun foods. Fun foods, like donuts, get old after a while when there are no restrictions (mental or physical) around them, so that’s why intuitive eaters have no moral dilemma when presented with a donut. They eat it, or they don’t because they know that donuts are fair game whenever the craving hits. 

4
It’s not just about eating donuts all day.

Another common misconception is that intuitive eating is all about fun food all the time. The truth is that yes, in order to make peace with all foods, there’s often a “honeymoon” phase, if you will, with certain foods that have been off-limits. Those foods are typically deemed “bad” in our culture, so that’s why you might see more photos of those on Instagram to normalize them. After that honeymoon phase, all foods are fair game, and there’s eventually a great balance in the diet of fuel food and fun foods. Fun foods, like donuts, get old after a while when there are no restrictions (mental or physical) around them, so that’s why intuitive eaters have no moral dilemma when presented with a donut. They eat it, or they don’t because they know that donuts are fair game whenever the craving hits. 

It’s a process, and it takes time.

The last big misconception is the notion that you can become an intuitive eater overnight. Tapping back into your body’s innate intuitive nature takes time. Just learning to re-trust my fullness cues took me what I think was about half a year. Finding joy and peace in moving my body took so much longer after years of using exercise as punishment or to manipulate my body shape and size. It takes time to release the mental rules and rigidity around eating. It takes time for your body shape and size to fall at the range that’s right for you. It takes time to appreciate size diversity and maybe even grieve the loss of the body you had when dieting or restricting. This process can take years, and it’s imperative to give yourself a whole lot of self-compassion and grace, because you are surrounded by a culture that tells you dieting is the norm. It’s hard to swim upstream, but I promise you, it’s a lot more peaceful than living in diet culture. 

Feel free to follow and reach out to me on Instagram at @constancelyeating or if you would like to work with me in-person in Denver, or virtually, check out Nourished With Hannah to learn more about Hannah and me! 
 

5
It’s a process, and it takes time.

The last big misconception is the notion that you can become an intuitive eater overnight. Tapping back into your body’s innate intuitive nature takes time. Just learning to re-trust my fullness cues took me what I think was about half a year. Finding joy and peace in moving my body took so much longer after years of using exercise as punishment or to manipulate my body shape and size. It takes time to release the mental rules and rigidity around eating. It takes time for your body shape and size to fall at the range that’s right for you. It takes time to appreciate size diversity and maybe even grieve the loss of the body you had when dieting or restricting. This process can take years, and it’s imperative to give yourself a whole lot of self-compassion and grace, because you are surrounded by a culture that tells you dieting is the norm. It’s hard to swim upstream, but I promise you, it’s a lot more peaceful than living in diet culture. 

Feel free to follow and reach out to me on Instagram at @constancelyeating or if you would like to work with me in-person in Denver, or virtually, check out Nourished With Hannah to learn more about Hannah and me! 
 

Connie Weissmuller MINDBODY
Written by
Connie Weissmuller
Registered Dietitian
About the author
A registered dietitian who loves helping people achieve food and body freedom, Connie specializes in the treatment of eating disorders, intuitive eating, and body image from a Health At Every Size lens. Working with clients to overcome food and body struggles, she is all about giving you the tools you need to find what healthy means to you.