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Wellness podcasts
Wellness
Published Thursday May 17, 2018 by Caitlin Parker

6 Wellness Podcasts You Need to Listen to, Right Now

Motivation
Meditation

As the weather warms up and our energy levels increase, it can be a great time to reevaluate our intentions for the year. My favorite way to press the reset button? Podcasts. By creating an atmosphere of growth and learning, I can tune into some added wellness inspiration to boost my happiness in a big way. 

Start your mental spring cleaning with these six inspiring podcasts, each of which explores different components of wellness. The best part? You can listen to them while doing other good-for-you activities, like finding your zen in yoga, going for a walk, meal prepping, or during your evening skincare routine.
 

 

Hurry Slowly
Jocelyn K. Glei 
 
Hurry Slowly

Launched last year, this newer podcast already has me hooked. Hurry Slowly tackles the great struggle around having enough time. Host Jocelyn K. Glei offers thoughtful advice on how to boost productivity, concentration, and creativity while reducing stress. The secret? Slowing down, occasionally unplugging from our devices, getting outside, and paying attention to our surroundings. Paired with insightful interviews with psychologists, researchers, and other thought leaders, Glei’s astute observations are definitely worth a listen.
 
 

Happier with Gretchen Rubin
Gretchen Rubin
 
Happier with Gretchen Rubin

A self-described “happiness bully,” best-selling author Gretchen Rubin and her co-host/sister, Elizabeth Craft, discuss happiness hacks for everyday life. From creating weekly phone dates with your best friend to setting aside a “power hour” to get all your errands done ASAP, these ladies will have you rethinking your routine. Each episode contains easy, try-this-at-home tips to create lasting healthy habits, how-to’s for habit change, and ways to tackle difficult problems based on your personality type. When you need a little motivation to get more sleep, eat better, procrastinate less, or make time for fun (who doesn’t?), this one’s for you!
 
 

Saje
Saje
 
Well Now

Another star newcomer is Well Now, by natural wellness brand Saje and hosted by Meghann Shantz. Focused on empowering listeners to take control of their health and advocate for themselves, Well Now is opening the dialogue between traditional and alternative medicine. With personal stories as well as conversations with doctors, wellness practitioners, and integrative medicine experts, Well Now explores root causes, treatment options, and alternative perspectives on a variety of health-related topics, from anxiety to antibiotics. This podcast highlights the undeniable connection between mental health and physical well-being. 
 
 

10% Happier
Facebook

10% Happier with Dan Harris

After suffering a panic attack on live TV, ABC news anchor Dan Harris turned to meditation to help heal the underlying causes of his anxiety. Initially a skeptic, his experience was transformative and led him to write a book, create this podcast, and develop an app, all called 10% Happier. Determined to bring meditation into the mainstream, Harris’ conversations with everyone from the Dalai Lama to RuPaul provide relatable advice and useful tools for how to reap the benefits of mindfulness and to create a meditation practice for yourself—even if it’s just one minute a day.       
 
 

Dear Sugar Radio
NPR 
 
Dear Sugar Radio

This one tugs at your emotional heartstrings and really makes you think. Before the success of her memoir Wild, Cheryl Strayed was “Sugar,” the anonymous author of an advice column in which she answered letters from readers struggling with issues, from heartbreak and family drama to gender identity and financial problems. Strayed and co-host Steve Almond read select letters aloud, offering heartfelt, non-judgmental, and deeply insightful advice with an incredible sense of humor. When you need a little perspective on your own obstacles, Dear Sugar is the antidote.
 
 

Magic Lessons Podcast
The Blissful Mind
 
Magic Lessons

Elizabeth Gilbert (of Eat Pray Love fame) adapted her most recent book, Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, into this inspiring podcast. If you’ve ever started a creative project and gotten stuck halfway—or maybe have been too scared to get started at all—Magic Lessons is your answer. Each episode, Gilbert speaks with a listener who is struggling with their creativity, offers her wisdom, and then calls on fellow writers, artists, and musicians for further insight into the creative process. She gives her protégées “homework assignments” to help them get unstuck and move past their fears, all with her signature wit and nurturing encouragement.


Whether you want a little pick-me-up or need some healthy habit hacks, there’s a wellness podcast for that. Plug in your headphones and turn the volume up on some inspirational (and realistic) insight! 
 

Caitlin Parker
Written by
Caitlin Parker
Contributor
About the author
Caitlin is a freelance writer hailing from New Jersey who is passionate about wellness, mindfulness, travel and getting outdoors. In her spare time, she can usually be found at a barre or yoga class, reading, hiking, or Instagramming a pour-over coffee.
Prenatal Fitness - MINDBODY
Fitness
Published Wednesday Sep 11, 2019 by Whitney English

The Do’s and Don’ts of Prenatal Fitness 

Yoga
Pilates
Barre
Strength Training
Cardio
Expert Advice

For many pregnant women, exercise can take a backseat. I get it. You’re exhausted and uncomfortable—slipping into a pair of tight leggings and sweating your booty off doesn’t exactly sound like a great way to reduce your discomfort.
 
While working out may sound like the last thing you want to do when you’re carrying another human inside of you, engaging in regular, low-impact activities during pregnancy is extremely beneficial to both you and your baby. In fact, some studies show that prenatal exercise may help to reduce aches and pains, improve sleep, and boost mood. But figuring out which exercises are safe for you and your baby can be confusing. If you Google prenatal exercise, you’ll find a wide range of conflicting opinions on what moms-to-be should and shouldn’t do.
 
As a dietitian, a Certified Personal Trainer, and a mom to a 16-month old, exercise has always been a priority for me. During my pregnancy, I was determined to continue my regular routine as long as possible, so I spent a ton of time researching and speaking to experts to learn the best practices for exercise during pregnancy. Here is my list of do’s and don’ts when it comes to prenatal fitness, no matter where you are when it comes to motherhood. 
 

Yoga

First up, yoga. You want to avoid any poses that cramp your baby’s space or put pressure on your stomach. It’s easy to modify most poses to make them safer and more comfortable for you and your baby. For example, instead of trying to do a regular forward fold, open up your legs for a wide leg forward fold, which gives your belly more space. 
 
Some poses can be fine during the first or second trimester, depending on your prior yoga experience, but may be less safe later in pregnancy. If you are comfortable doing full wheel, it can be fine early in your pregnancy. I did this pose until about 25 weeks, but everyone is different. Keep in mind that pregnancy is not the time to push yourself with new poses. Additionally, after the first trimester, it’s best to avoid lying face down. Instead, try doing certain poses on your knees rather than on your stomach—like substituting camel pose for bow pose.
 

1
Yoga

First up, yoga. You want to avoid any poses that cramp your baby’s space or put pressure on your stomach. It’s easy to modify most poses to make them safer and more comfortable for you and your baby. For example, instead of trying to do a regular forward fold, open up your legs for a wide leg forward fold, which gives your belly more space. 
 
Some poses can be fine during the first or second trimester, depending on your prior yoga experience, but may be less safe later in pregnancy. If you are comfortable doing full wheel, it can be fine early in your pregnancy. I did this pose until about 25 weeks, but everyone is different. Keep in mind that pregnancy is not the time to push yourself with new poses. Additionally, after the first trimester, it’s best to avoid lying face down. Instead, try doing certain poses on your knees rather than on your stomach—like substituting camel pose for bow pose.
 

Pilates + Barre

Similarly, with both Pilates and barre, you want to avoid doing any stretches or poses that put pressure on or around your abdominal cavity. During the early stages of pregnancy, you may not need any modifications, but the most important thing is to listen to your body and not push the limits. As your pregnancy progresses, remember to ask the instructor for modifications, so the exercise feels good for both you and baby.

2
Pilates + Barre

Similarly, with both Pilates and barre, you want to avoid doing any stretches or poses that put pressure on or around your abdominal cavity. During the early stages of pregnancy, you may not need any modifications, but the most important thing is to listen to your body and not push the limits. As your pregnancy progresses, remember to ask the instructor for modifications, so the exercise feels good for both you and baby.

Hot Exercise + Heated Classes

Another crucial thing to avoid during pregnancy is hot exercise. There is a lot of misinformation regarding hot exercise, but be wary of anyone that tells you that it is safe. Increasing your core body temperature is known as hyperthermia, and it can be extremely dangerous for pregnant women. It is especially dangerous in the first month just after contraception, but hot exercise and heated classes should be avoided at all stages of pregnancy.

3
Hot Exercise + Heated Classes

Another crucial thing to avoid during pregnancy is hot exercise. There is a lot of misinformation regarding hot exercise, but be wary of anyone that tells you that it is safe. Increasing your core body temperature is known as hyperthermia, and it can be extremely dangerous for pregnant women. It is especially dangerous in the first month just after contraception, but hot exercise and heated classes should be avoided at all stages of pregnancy.

Strength Training

When it comes to strength and circuit training, exercises like lunges and jumping may put excessive pressure on your belly as you get farther along in your pregnancy. Trust your body and discontinue these if they feel unsafe. Any exercises that cause you to hold your breath or could result in trauma to your belly, (for example kettlebell swings or powerlifting) I would advise against.

4
Strength Training

When it comes to strength and circuit training, exercises like lunges and jumping may put excessive pressure on your belly as you get farther along in your pregnancy. Trust your body and discontinue these if they feel unsafe. Any exercises that cause you to hold your breath or could result in trauma to your belly, (for example kettlebell swings or powerlifting) I would advise against.

Cardio

With cardio, the rule is that you should be able to continue to hold a steady conversation during exercise. For some, running may be fine up until the end of your pregnancy. Others may find this puts too much pressure on their pelvic floor. Some low-impact alternatives include walking (on both a flat surface and uphill), swimming, elliptical machine, rowing machine, and low-intensity aerobic exercise.
 

If you’re looking for exercise classes to take while pregnant, I recommend searching for something mellow on the MINDBODY app, such as restorative or gentle flow yoga, beginner Reformer Pilates, or any other light, introductory classes.
 
As a general rule, if you’re questioning whether or not something is safe to do during pregnancy, it probably isn’t. Remember that the most important thing is the safety of both you and your baby, and no form or intensity of exercise is worth sacrificing that!
 
For more information on a healthy pregnancy, including nutritious recipes and exercise ideas, check out my Predominantly Plant-Based Pregnancy Guide!

5
Cardio

With cardio, the rule is that you should be able to continue to hold a steady conversation during exercise. For some, running may be fine up until the end of your pregnancy. Others may find this puts too much pressure on their pelvic floor. Some low-impact alternatives include walking (on both a flat surface and uphill), swimming, elliptical machine, rowing machine, and low-intensity aerobic exercise.
 

If you’re looking for exercise classes to take while pregnant, I recommend searching for something mellow on the MINDBODY app, such as restorative or gentle flow yoga, beginner Reformer Pilates, or any other light, introductory classes.
 
As a general rule, if you’re questioning whether or not something is safe to do during pregnancy, it probably isn’t. Remember that the most important thing is the safety of both you and your baby, and no form or intensity of exercise is worth sacrificing that!
 
For more information on a healthy pregnancy, including nutritious recipes and exercise ideas, check out my Predominantly Plant-Based Pregnancy Guide!

Whitney English - MINDBODY
Written by
Whitney English
Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
About the author
A former journalist and entertainment reporter in Los Angeles, Whitney English found her passion in wellness and nutrition. Tired of the quick fix promises she encountered in Hollywood, she became a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Personal Trainer, making it her mission to research health trends to help determine the best ways to eat, move, and live for long-lasting health.