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thanksgiving food myths
Wellness
Published Thursday Nov 14, 2019 by Mooch and Mel

4 Habits You’ll Be Thankful to Forget This Thanksgiving  

Food
Nutrition
Expert Advice

Turkey-Day-Trepidation. It’s real. Worrying the feast will derail your fitness goals, giving side dishes the side-eye, and wondering how it’ll all affect your stomach. Then, alleviating fear from these worries by vowing never to eat cookies, carbs, or canned onion strings, ever again.

Thanksgiving just so happens to be our favorite holiday of the year. Not only because it synchronizes food, family, and football, but because the energy of the day aligns with what we love. Gratitude. So let’s cut the panic that keeps us from truly enjoying this holiday. 

Carry these reminders with you to ease your worries and relish in your turkey (or tofurkey) on the big day.

Earning your food isn’t a thing.

We’re all for a Turkey Day trot, but when people hit the streets to sweat so they can “earn” their food, we cringe. Food brings a different value. Sometimes it’s to fuel, sometimes to recover; sometimes it’s to nourish, and other times it’s just to enjoy. Focus on the value of your food at any given moment and forget the idea that you have to do tricks for treats.

1
Earning your food isn’t a thing.

We’re all for a Turkey Day trot, but when people hit the streets to sweat so they can “earn” their food, we cringe. Food brings a different value. Sometimes it’s to fuel, sometimes to recover; sometimes it’s to nourish, and other times it’s just to enjoy. Focus on the value of your food at any given moment and forget the idea that you have to do tricks for treats.

Turkey doesn’t make you sleepy.

When teaching about food combinations and energy related to digestion, we use Thanksgiving as the prime example. Turkey isn’t what makes you want to curl up into a ball on the couch for three days (with a slice of pie within reach, of course). The fatigue stems from the energy your body is employing to digest and break down intricate food combinations and large quantities of food. Digestion is an energy source. When we have to use massive amounts of energy to break down our food, that’s when we become sleepy.

2
Turkey doesn’t make you sleepy.

When teaching about food combinations and energy related to digestion, we use Thanksgiving as the prime example. Turkey isn’t what makes you want to curl up into a ball on the couch for three days (with a slice of pie within reach, of course). The fatigue stems from the energy your body is employing to digest and break down intricate food combinations and large quantities of food. Digestion is an energy source. When we have to use massive amounts of energy to break down our food, that’s when we become sleepy.

You don’t have to start on Monday.

You don’t have to earn your food, nor do you have to “make up” for eating it. That kind of thinking can cause you to consume almost twice as much food on the holidays, which hurts your digestive system more significantly. Please do not turn to deprivation, juice cleanses, or extreme dieting to undo the holiday. Not only is that worse for your body, but it’s even worse for your mind. There is nothing wrong with choosing to enjoy your favorite foods and flavors.

3
You don’t have to start on Monday.

You don’t have to earn your food, nor do you have to “make up” for eating it. That kind of thinking can cause you to consume almost twice as much food on the holidays, which hurts your digestive system more significantly. Please do not turn to deprivation, juice cleanses, or extreme dieting to undo the holiday. Not only is that worse for your body, but it’s even worse for your mind. There is nothing wrong with choosing to enjoy your favorite foods and flavors.

Your value is not on your plate. 

If your favorite foods happen to be greener, healthier versions of traditional dishes, or simple meals lacking in decadence, that’s fine, too. When someone takes it personally that you won’t eat the same things as them, remember that you aren’t responsible for anyone’s health and happiness but your own. The bottom line: your value is not on your plate. And you don’t need to prove your value by filling, or not filling, your plate with certain foods.

Remember, the best part of the holiday season is the connections you make. Make eye contact, listen to others, and tell people you love them. Be present, be grateful, and know that food is a way to connect and celebrate no matter its form.

Change your thinking to toss the trepidations, and truly enjoy the Thanksgiving holiday.

4
Your value is not on your plate. 

If your favorite foods happen to be greener, healthier versions of traditional dishes, or simple meals lacking in decadence, that’s fine, too. When someone takes it personally that you won’t eat the same things as them, remember that you aren’t responsible for anyone’s health and happiness but your own. The bottom line: your value is not on your plate. And you don’t need to prove your value by filling, or not filling, your plate with certain foods.

Remember, the best part of the holiday season is the connections you make. Make eye contact, listen to others, and tell people you love them. Be present, be grateful, and know that food is a way to connect and celebrate no matter its form.

Change your thinking to toss the trepidations, and truly enjoy the Thanksgiving holiday.

Mooch & Mel - MINDBODY
Written by
Mooch and Mel
Co-owners | Move With MM
About the author
A finalist in America's Most Inspiring Trainer, Mooch is a nutrition nut and personal trainer in bootcamp and cycling classes. Mel, a yoga instructor, life coach, and gut health educator, loves guiding others to overcome anxiety and feel more energized. Together, they bring a balance of compassion and tough love to help busy women who feel stuck, move!
dailey method class hanging
Fitness
Published Monday Feb 17, 2020 by The Dailey Method

How to Be Intentional with Your Workout: Tips from The Dailey Method

Fitness
Barre
Cycling

The intentions we set in our daily lives are often methods for healing wounds, whether they’re self-inflicted or have been passed down to us by others. Developing a conscious practice to get rid of negative thoughts or feelings we’re holding onto can help us move in a more positive direction toward letting go, healing, and being present. 

Moving intentionally within our bodies allows us to fully notice how they feel so we can acknowledge and target the right areas. Some days we struggle to work hard enough while others, we push ourselves too hard! We do this both in class and in other areas of our life. It's important to remember to understand our bodies’ rhythms or fatigue while making space for our humanness, feelings, or need to be vulnerable.  

Here are a few simple guidelines for following intentions during your workout:

 

The Dailey Method class stretching

Be intentional about the way you set up each exercise.  

Remember that just like in life, taking a moment to pause and build the appropriate foundation will undoubtedly support you to be 100% successful on your journey. At The Dailey Method, we refer to this kind of mindful exercise as a “meditation in movement” and begin our practice with intentions. During the warmup, instructors encourage students to set an intention for their workout, even if it’s just a focus on breath, and then revisit it during their final resting pose. Often, we associate these goals with our Word of the Month, a specific theme to help guide our practice each month. But there are so many intentions to choose from—moving with your breath, moving with grace, forgiving yourself, shining your light out, the options are limitless, and you can alter them each day depending on where you are right here and right now. 

“Personally, I am so grateful for this process being part of my Dailey practice,” says Jill Dailey, founder of The Dailey Method. “It is a built-in opportunity for me to stay in the present, and when I wander (because of course I do!) a tool to guide my presence back to the here and now.” 

 

The Dailey Method cycling class
Pause when it’s tough. 

When the workout gets challenging or you feel like giving up at any point during class, set an intention to pause and remember the fact that we are all on this same path, doing this exercise together. You have all the tools you need to be successful—even if it means taking a quick rest or resetting your alignment! Don’t compare yourself to others; just focus on yourself and your goals for the workout. Remember why you’re there.  

 

The Dailey Method class with resistance bands

Carry your intentions with you.  

As you leave class, move with deliberation and show up at your next appointment, event, family gathering, or grocery shopping excursion as the greatest version of you. You just rocked your class and brought effort, strength, perseverance, and commitment. Acknowledge that and bring it with you. Don't forget about the intentions you set during class; figure out how you can apply them to other areas of your life! 

Make moving with intention part of your next workout by taking a class at The Dailey Method near you today!  

The Dailey Method Logo
Written by
The Dailey Method
Barre & Cycle Fitness Studio
About the author
The Dailey Method is here to help you achieve a strong, lean, sculpted body through fitness classes that pull from multiple disciplines. They ignite awareness through hands-on training and education, focusing on alignment and strength for a better posture, better movement, and better you.