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3 Plant-Based Side Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner
Wellness
Published Saturday Nov 10, 2018 by Erica Fowler

3 Plant-Based Side Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

Nutrition
Food

Wondering what to whip up for Thanksgiving? Whether you’re hosting your very own feast or want to bring a healthy, no-meat option on the big day, here are three tasty, plant-based side dishes all of your friends and family will be grateful for.

 

 

MINDBODY healthy thanksgiving recipes

Candied Pecan Maple Brussels Sprouts

Serves: 4-6   

Ingredients:

- 20 to 30 Brussels sprouts
- 2 tablespoons olive oil
- 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup
- 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
- Pinch of salt and ground pepper
- ½ teaspoon garlic powder
For candied pecans:
-  ½ cup raw pecans, chopped
- ¼ teaspoon coconut sugar
- 1 teaspoon maple syrup
- Dash of salt
 
Directions: 

- Preheat large saucepan on stovetop over medium heat. 
- Place Brussels sprouts in a large bowl. Rinse with cold water.
- Cut bottom stems off and discard. Slice Brussels sprouts in half, vertically. 
- In small bowl, combine olive oil, maple syrup, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper, and garlic powder.
- Place sliced Brussels sprouts back in a large bowl and add olive oil dressing, coating evenly. 
- Add Brussels sprouts into heated saucepan, face down. Pour any leftover dressing over the Brussels sprouts and let cook until tender, roughly 4-5 minutes. When they begin turning brown on the face-down side, drizzle a tablespoon or so of water over the top to steam. 
- While the Brussels sprouts are cooking, create the candied pecan mixture by placing pecans in a small bowl, mixing in maple syrup, coconut sugar, and salt.
- Once Brussels sprouts are crispy, use a fork to flip.
- Place the candied pecans on top of the Brussels sprouts and continue to cook for about 3-4 minutes, until tender and crispy. 
- Remove from heat. Scoop into a serving dish and enjoy!
 
 

MINDBODY healthy thanksgiving recipes

Sage and Parsley Wild Rice

Serves: 4-6  

Ingredients:

- 3 cups uncooked wild rice
- 1 teaspoon olive oil
- 4 cloves fresh garlic, minced
- 2 cups mushrooms, thinly sliced
- Dash of salt and ground pepper
- 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced
- 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, minced
- 1 tablespoon sliced almonds
- ½ teaspoon dried thyme
Optional 
- Handful of hemp seeds
 
Directions:

- Cook wild rice according to the directions on the package.
- In the meantime, warm a skillet on the stove over medium heat. Add olive oil and minced garlic to heated pan and let it cook for 1 minute, stirring frequently.
- Add sliced mushrooms, salt and pepper, sage, parsley (save a pinch for serving), thyme, and almonds to olive oil and garlic. Cook for 4-5 minutes, stirring frequently.
- Once rice is done, add to pan and let cook on low heat for about 5 minutes.
- Taste and adjust, adding more salt or seasoning as needed. 
- Top with a pinch of fresh parsley and hemp seeds and enjoy!
 

MINDBODY healthy thanksgiving recipes
Rosemary Cheesy Garlic Baked Potatoes

Serves: 3-4 

Ingredients:

- 3-4 Yukon Gold potatoes
- 2 tablespoons olive oil
- 4 cloves fresh garlic, minced
- 1 tablespoon dried rosemary
- ¼ teaspoon dried thyme
- ¼ teaspoon of pink salt, plus more for seasoning 
-¼ teaspoon of pepper, plus more for seasoning 
- 2 tablespoons gluten-free flour
- 2 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk
- 2 tablespoons water
- 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast or homemade vegan parmesan
- Coconut oil 
 - ¼ teaspoon paprika

 

Directions: 

- Preheat oven to 350° degrees.
- Peel and thinly slice potatoes. Set aside.
- Warm a large skillet on medium heat, adding olive oil and minced garlic. Stir for a minute or so until the garlic is fragrant.
 - Add rosemary, thyme, nutritional yeast (or homemade parmesan), salt and pepper and stir.
- Mix in the gluten-free flour and continue to stir through, letting simmer for about 1 minute while continually mixing. Pour in almond milk.
- Whisk slowly until ingredients become a thick broth consistency. Add 2 tablespoons of water and continue mixing.
- Transfer mixture into a blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary. 
- Grease an 8x8 baking pan with coconut oil. Evenly line the bottom of the pan with sliced potatoes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
- Pour the blended mixture over the potatoes until fully coated. Top with paprika. 
- Cover with foil and bake in the oven for 25 minutes.
- Remove foil and bake for an additional 35-40 minutes on the middle rack until the potatoes are tender and the top is crispy. 
- Serve and enjoy!
 

Erica Fowler
Written by
Erica Fowler
Contributor | Holistic Nutritionist
About the author
With a heart-filled passion for holistic living and people, Erica spends most her time in Southern California along the salty coast when she’s not traveling. Focused on helping her clients find a natural balance, Erica encourages them to thrive through delicious, simple recipes and healthy habits.
Yoga sleep tips MINDBODY
Wellness
Published Wednesday Sep 18, 2019 by Amber Scriven

4 Yoga Poses for a Better Night’s Sleep

Yoga
Personal Growth
Expert Advice

We’ve all had sleepless nights. It’s the worst! Watching the wee hours of morning tick away. Wishing we could slip into a restful sleep before our alarm goes off . The frustrating feeling of knowing exactly how many minutes there are before you need to be up. Then, struggling through a heavy relentless morning filled with self-medicating coffee runs, and a tired, snappy version of yourself dragging through the day. 

There’s no one miracle cure for insomnia because there are so many reasons for not being able to sleep. Many people, however, find relief by curbing stress right before bed. One way to do that is with a few choice yoga stretches that mellow you out by encouraging your Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) to ignite your bodies “rest and digest” cycles. This is the opposite of the “fight or flight” system that helps you race away from oncoming tigers, or other more urban “dangers.”  

Here are a few shapes that calm the nervous system and decrease adrenaline in the body to help you rest and ultimately sleep better. 
 

Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

1
Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

2
Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

3
Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

4
Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

Amber Scriven Acupuncturist
Written by
Amber Scriven
Acupuncturist | Yoga Teacher
About the author
A busy acupuncturist, yoga teacher and trainer, Amber has actively worked in the wellness industry for over 10 years. For her, yoga is a form of health care that she uses alongside acupuncture in the form of retreats, injury rehabilitation, and pain relief. Amber is renowned for building emotional strength while cultivating physical health.