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MINDBODY app UK men's health week
Local
Published Friday Jun 07, 2019 by Lydia Cardona

Why More UK Men Are Exercising for Their Mental Health

Fitness
Personal Growth

More than 52%¹ of men in the UK believe it’s important to look physically attractive. 

But, new research¹ conducted by MINDBODY reveals that looking good may not be the only reason many men return to the gym again and again. 

- On an average day, 35% of men would rate their overall happiness/mental wellbeing at 3/5, 5 being most content.
- Thirty-one percent of men are somewhat anxious or stressed daily.

 
Before this year’s Men’s Health Week, MINDBODY researchers set out to determine the reasons why men in the UK initially signed up to the gym and whether their reasons changed after attending.


The top 5 reasons men first join a gym are to:

1.     Increase their overall fitness levels (64%).
2.     Build muscle (35%).
3.     Make healthier choices throughout the day/week e.g., food/drink (28%).
4.     Help their mental health (25%).
5.     Increase their confidence (25%).
 

Sixty-four percent of men said their motives for continuing to go to a gym didn’t change, while 29% had changed somewhat, and 7% said their reasons had changed completely.


The top 3 reasons men continue going to the gym are to:

1.     Increase their fitness levels (29%).
2.     Make healthier choices throughout the day/week (26%).
3.     Keep on top of their mental health (17%).

 

With men whose reasons had changed for going to the gym still showing an interest in keeping their mental health on track, MINDBODY researchers did a deeper dive into men’s attitudes toward their emotional wellbeing.²

They found that, on an average day, 13% would rate their overall happiness or mental wellbeing at 5/5 (5 being content) compared to 35% who would rate it at 3/5. As a result, 31% are somewhat anxious or stressed daily.

"As people progress in exercise, they begin to develop stronger, faster, and more coordinated muscles which help build their confidence as they grow,” said Nick Davies, Sports Performance Mind Coach at NDSP. “What's more, exercise, like any endeavor, has its fair share of ups and downs and we learn, or reinforce, that losing is not the end, but something you strive to overcome, and this is where you develop mental strength. 
 
Whatever activity you choose to participate in, make sure you enjoy it. The enjoyment side of exercise contributes to the endorphins that the brain releases, which has an extremely positive impact on your mental and physical wellbeing."
 
Physical movement became medicine for Leon Taylor, Olympic Silver Medalist, after the family doctor labelled him a ‘problem’ child’ due to his hyperactivity, he said.

“My parents would attempt to tire me out, so I did all the physical activity I could for my age. Then something magical happened; I became easier to manage. It’s widely known the negative effects of inactivity on someone’s physical health and the associated risk of disease, but what is concerning to me is the link between inactivity and someone’s mental health,” says Taylor.

“As MINDBODY’s research indicates, feeling anxious and overwhelmed is so commonplace today. I’d argue that we spend too much time stuck in our heads and not enough in our bodies, as overthinking can lead to psychological stress. When we start to move, our brain releases a protein called BDNF (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor) to protect us from stress; at the same time, endorphins are released. BDNF acts as a reset switch, which is why we often feel so at ease after moving. Long-term, consistent physical movement changes the structure of our brain, boosts self-esteem, and decreases biological action to psychological stress, which is an enemy to mental health. Physical movement is our best weapon to respond.”
 
Charlotte Newton, Senior Manager EMEA Marketing at MINDBODY, comments on the research findings: 

“It’s no secret that there is a stigma around men being hesitant to speak about their mental health. However, whilst our research reveals that a third of men would only rate their overall happiness/mental wellbeing at 3/5, it’s great to see that men realise the fantastic benefits exercise can have on their wellbeing, both physically and mentally!”
 
Looking to boost your body and mind? Download the MINDBODY app or explore new fitness on MINDBODY.io
 


1.     Research taken from YouGov Profiles in May 2019
2.     Survey of 1,148 UK men who have been to the gym and/or studio in the last week, undertaken in May 2019
3.     Research taken from MINDBODY’s Wellness Index undertaken in February 2018
 
Lydia Cardona
Written by
Lydia Cardona
PR and Content Specialist, EMEA Marketing
About the author
A self-confessed exercise and sports junkie, Lydia made the transition from fashion to wellness, handling media relations in the U.K. In her spare time, you'll most likely find her hitting up a MINDBODY studio, shopping for houseplants, or walking the family Pomchi.
Goat Cheese Ball healthy recipe
Wellness
Published Tuesday Jan 21, 2020 by Mckenzie Hathaway

Goat "Cheese" Ball

Recipes
Food

Did you know you can make mouth-watering “fake” cheese with macadamia nuts? Yes, macadamia nuts. If you’re craving that creamy consistency but your stomach isn’t down for dairy, try out this recipe inspired by Simple Vegan Blog

Ingredients
  • 1 cup of macadamia nuts (soaked overnight)
  • 1 1/2 lemon 
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 tsp raw virgin olive oil
  • ¾ cup water
  • 1 tbsp rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon pink Himalayan salt 
Directions
  • Place the macadamia nuts into a bowl and cover with water to soak for at least 7 hours. 
  • Drain and wash macadamia nuts before placing it in a high-speed blender (I use my refurbished Vitamix). 
  • Add lemon juice, garlic cloves, olive oil, water, and blend for about two minutes until extremely thick.
  • Slowly add in the lemon juice, followed by rosemary, salt, and any additional seasoning that you desire.
  • In a large bowl, lay out a cheesecloth that will hold the macadamia mixture. Make sure your cheesecloth is large enough to hold the entire mixture. It will be very thick, so scoop it from the blender into the cloth that is within the bowl.
  • Once in the cloth, in the bowl, wrap the mixture up in the cloth into a ball. With an elastic band, tie the top so the mixture is in a tight bowl. It should be a large softball size.
  • Squeeze out any extra liquid and place the cheese ball in the fridge for at least 14 hours(I left mine for about 24 hours, and it was perfect). 
  • When you are ready to bake this bad boy, preheat the oven to 175°C/350°F.
  • Grease a baking pan with olive oil, well. Don’t make my mistakebe sure to put enough oil! 
  • Carefully unwrap the cheese ball from the cloth and shape into a perfect round ball.
  • Place on the very greased pan and bake for 45 minutes or until the top is golden brown. However, check it about halfway. You may need to turn down the oven for the final 20 minutes. If your cheese is cracking while golden brown, that is perfect! 

Once taken out of the oven, it’s ready to serve. It will be difficult to transfer – so if you can decorate the pan and serve directly on it with crackers and veggies that’s what I recommend.

Mckenzie Hathaway MINDBODY
Written by
Mckenzie Hathaway
Media & PR Specialist
About the author
From working at a fashion magazine to taking on the tech industry, Mckenzie is passionate about all things Public Relations. Outside of the office, you will find her trail running, swimming in the ocean, or creating plant-based recipes as she heals her body from autoimmune diseases.