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daylight savings tips
Local
Published Saturday Mar 02, 2019 by Lydia Cardona

Top Tips to Adjust Your Body Clock to the Daylight Saving this Spring

Yoga
Fitness

As the recent freak warm weather suggests, the start of warmer weather and daylight saving time is upon us. As the clocks spring forward by one hour, we’ll benefit from lighter mornings and later sunsets. However, losing as little as one hour can be enough to leave people feeling groggy for a day or two. 

Research from a recent study by MINDBODY found that on average, people who went to the gym got more sleep over a 24-hour high-intensity period. But what happens when the clocks change? We’ve asked the experts—and compiled some trusty tips—for what we can do to better prepare ourselves for the time difference.

 

Daily exercise is vital in promoting better sleep. 

“Whether it’s a brisk walk outside, a jog or a high-intensity class, it all counts and you’ll feel less restless when your head hits the pillow, making it easier to get an early night,” says Fiona Crossley, the owner at F45 Kingston

 

A pre-bedtime routine is essential for adjusting and shaking off that ‘jet lag’ feeling.

“For the week leading up to the clocks changing, move your routine up by a few minutes each day. For example, begin to wind down 45 mins before going to bed (instead of your usual 30) and ban screens and reading material in bed,” says Leon Taylor, an Olympic medallist and yoga teacher. “Put your phone in another room (use an alarm clock if needed) and ensure your room is dark, quiet and slightly cool in temperature for best quality sleep.”

 

Easily elevate your routine… and find time for you!  

Need a little *extra* help when it comes to adapting to the time change? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered with our battle-tested tips and tricks:


- Channel the positive energy: Introduce a short meditation practice every day to help you unwind and calm the mind. Try Re:Mind on for guided sessions.

- Let the light in: Soak up some Vitamin-D! Get off the bus one stop early on the way to work, park further from the office or take your morning meeting outside to give yourself some extra natural sunlight.

- Sweet dreams: Bank your sleep and try taking a power nap on Sunday—but no longer than an hour—to reset your body (and mind) for the week ahead.

- Just breathe: Try 10 minutes of stretching with focused yoga breathing before bed to release the day’s tension and better settle in for an early night.

- Say ‘no thank you’: Coffee or cocktails? Politely decline. Avoid stimulants that can interfere with sleep, like caffeine and alcohol.

 
Whatever you try this daylight saving time, resetting your internal clock the healthy and natural way will have you embracing those extra hours of daylight all spring and summer long! 
 

Lydia Cardona
Written by
Lydia Cardona
PR and Content Specialist, EMEA Marketing
About the author
A self-confessed exercise and sports junkie, Lydia made the transition from fashion to wellness, handling media relations in the U.K. In her spare time, you'll most likely find her hitting up a MINDBODY studio, shopping for houseplants, or walking the family Pomchi.
Yoga sleep tips MINDBODY
Wellness
Published Wednesday Sep 18, 2019 by Amber Scriven

4 Yoga Poses for a Better Night’s Sleep

Yoga
Personal Growth
Expert Advice

We’ve all had sleepless nights. It’s the worst! Watching the wee hours of morning tick away. Wishing we could slip into a restful sleep before our alarm goes off . The frustrating feeling of knowing exactly how many minutes there are before you need to be up. Then, struggling through a heavy relentless morning filled with self-medicating coffee runs, and a tired, snappy version of yourself dragging through the day. 

There’s no one miracle cure for insomnia because there are so many reasons for not being able to sleep. Many people, however, find relief by curbing stress right before bed. One way to do that is with a few choice yoga stretches that mellow you out by encouraging your Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) to ignite your bodies “rest and digest” cycles. This is the opposite of the “fight or flight” system that helps you race away from oncoming tigers, or other more urban “dangers.”  

Here are a few shapes that calm the nervous system and decrease adrenaline in the body to help you rest and ultimately sleep better. 
 

Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

1
Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

2
Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

3
Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

4
Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

Amber Scriven Acupuncturist
Written by
Amber Scriven
Acupuncturist | Yoga Teacher
About the author
A busy acupuncturist, yoga teacher and trainer, Amber has actively worked in the wellness industry for over 10 years. For her, yoga is a form of health care that she uses alongside acupuncture in the form of retreats, injury rehabilitation, and pain relief. Amber is renowned for building emotional strength while cultivating physical health.