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Nutrition Tips to Try While Training
Fitness
Published Thursday Jun 28, 2018 by Tom Johnson

Nutrition Tips to Try While Training

Fitness
Personal Training
Interval Training

While you might be wreaking havoc in the gym, research shows that what you eat before, during and after a sweat session is vital to your progress. Here are a few quick tips on how to harness the power of nutrition during your next workout.  

 
Focus on your pre-workout prep 

Tip #1 - Consume carbs – There’s nothing worse than feeling full during your fitness routine. Avoid foods higher in fat and fiber before your workout to avoid the bloat. Pre-workout nutrition should consist mainly of foods that are higher in carbohydrates. About 30 minutes before your workout, grab 15-20 grams of easy-to-digest carbs like Greek yogurt, fruit smoothies and sweet potatoes and 10-15 grams of moderate protein like 2-3 ounces of chicken (the size of your palm or less) or two eggs to fuel your body for peak performance. Whether it’s Greek yogurt or a whey protein powder smoothie with fruit, nourish yourself with sufficient sources of both carbs and protein.

 

Have a post-workout plan

Tip #2 - Fight that hungry feeling – Feeling extra hungry after that last rep? It’s time to get a handle on that post-workout hunger. Fat and fiber should be consumed in moderation as they can slow down the absorption of the carbs and proteins your body needs.

Tip #3 - Eating aids recovery – Pending bodyweight goals and exercise intensity, you’ll want to focus on consuming roughly 25-35 grams of carbs and 20 grams of protein like sweet potatoes or brown rice with 2-3 ounces of chicken breast or a tuna sandwich on whole wheat bread and low-fat mayo within 1-2 hours post-workout to help restore glycogen and aid in muscle repair and recovery. If you are short on time or don’t have any sources of carbs and protein within reach, protein bars (like Quest or Pure Protein that are also higher in fiber) are a great on-the-go option.  

Tip #4 - Stay hydrated –If you train hard by incorporating bouts of moderate intensity for 75 minutes or more and shorter bouts of HIIT or more intense interval training, you may want to try adding a low-sugar electrolyte + amino acid powder blend to your water for extra hydration. Including this tip into your fitness out routine can help to keep you properly fueled, maximizing your workout intensity. I prefer the powder blends, like Amino Action or Xtend, over the sugary Gatorade drinks. 


Reach your specific goals 

Tip #5 - Avoid empty calories – If you are working out with the goal of losing weight, avoid or limit calories found in beverages like alcohol, soda, and coffee with creamers or sugar. They provide little to no nutritional value and do not benefit your fitness routine. 

Tip #6 - Overcome that weight loss plateau – If training and/or dieting for weight loss, concentrate on eating most (if not all) of your carbs before and after your workout, snacking on small amounts of fruits and veggies throughout the day. Focusing your carb intake around your fitness schedule can be especially helpful if you have hit a weight loss plateau or are having trouble losing those last few pounds.  

Tip #7 - Watch your carb intake on rest days – Your carb intake should mirror your activity level. On rest days, lower your carb consumption since extra carbs aren’t needed for workout fuel or recovery. Even on off days, I generally don’t recommend going lower than 75 grams of carbs because your brain and body still need carbs to function adequately.

Tip #8 - Maximize muscle gain – If your workout routine includes intermediate or advanced weight + strength training, and muscle growth is one of your goals, mix 20 grams of casein protein powder like Optimum Nutrition or Muscletech in water, unsweetened almond milk or low-fat milk within 15-30 minutes before bed. This helps maximize muscle repair, growth and synthesis—which mostly occurs while sleeping.

 

Tom Johnson
Written by
Tom Johnson
Contributor | Personal Trainer
About the author
With a passion to help people increase their health and wealth, Tom is a personal trainer, group fitness instructor, and consults with others on nutrition planning. Graduating with an MBA from Purdue University, Tom has fitness certifications in Personal Training, Women’s Fitness, and Senior Fitness.
intuitive eating tips
Wellness
Published Tuesday Oct 22, 2019 by Connie Weissmuller

5 Things You Might Not Know About Intuitive Eating

Nutrition
Food
Expert Advice

Intuitive eating is an approach to eating that has nothing to do with diets, “lifestyle changes,” cleanses, or anything of the sort. It is a powerful way of giving trust and peace back to your body and mind, likely after a time of giving that trust up to external means of control such as using apps to count calories and steps, or intentionally trying to manipulate your body size. 

Intuitive eating, in its truest sense, is supportive of one’s mental, emotional, and physical health. However, as diet and wellness culture have co-opted the term, there has been some misinformation that actually isn’t in line with intuitive eating at all. As a Registered Dietitian and nutrition expert, I’m here to hopefully clear up some blurry lines and share with you some ways to get accurate information about intuitive eating.

If you see someone promoting intuitive eating as a means for intentional weight loss—run!

Here’s the thing; intuitive eating isn’t used for weight loss. Weight change may be an outcome of intuitive eating, but we have no idea whether that means an increase, decrease, or no change in weight. If someone is promoting intuitive eating as an explicit weight loss, slim down, or detox strategythat’s a red flag.

This is why many intuitive eating informed dietitians, counselors, and therapists suggest ditching the scale. The scale doesn’t tell you how well you are eating intuitively, and it certainly doesn’t give you helpful information regarding your health. At the end of the day, intuitive eating helps you move towards a healthy weight that is right for you. That’s also called your set point weight. It’s different for everyone. Intuitive eating is the nutrition paradigm supported by the larger paradigm of Health At Every Size, which respects body diversity, challenges scientific and cultural assumptions related to body size, and encourages finding joy in moving one’s body. There’s so much nuance, which is why there is value in working with a professional well-versed in intuitive eating and Health At Every Size

1
If you see someone promoting intuitive eating as a means for intentional weight loss—run!

Here’s the thing; intuitive eating isn’t used for weight loss. Weight change may be an outcome of intuitive eating, but we have no idea whether that means an increase, decrease, or no change in weight. If someone is promoting intuitive eating as an explicit weight loss, slim down, or detox strategythat’s a red flag.

This is why many intuitive eating informed dietitians, counselors, and therapists suggest ditching the scale. The scale doesn’t tell you how well you are eating intuitively, and it certainly doesn’t give you helpful information regarding your health. At the end of the day, intuitive eating helps you move towards a healthy weight that is right for you. That’s also called your set point weight. It’s different for everyone. Intuitive eating is the nutrition paradigm supported by the larger paradigm of Health At Every Size, which respects body diversity, challenges scientific and cultural assumptions related to body size, and encourages finding joy in moving one’s body. There’s so much nuance, which is why there is value in working with a professional well-versed in intuitive eating and Health At Every Size

It’s not just the hunger and fullness diet; there is so much nuance!

Often times, intuitive eating gets the most attention from “honoring hunger and fullness,” which is a huge part of intuitive eating, however; it’s not that simple. There are plenty of instances I can think of within myself, or with my clients in eating disorder and chronic dieting recovery, where you simply don’t get appropriate hunger and fullness cues.

Your body sends amazing signals when it needs nourishment, yet the culture we live in tells us that those innate signals can't be trusted. This can lead to diminished hunger and fullness cues from dieting, skipping meals, or following the bogus rule of no eating after 7 pm. This is where working with a professional to gain back appropriate cues is helpful. 

Sometimes we have to eat when we aren't hungry just for the simple reason that we need energy and nourishment. This can be uncomfortable. For example, before exams and presentations, while I was in school, I had no appetite, but I knew that my brain needed fuel. I practiced the gentle nutrition piece of intuitive eating and ate anyways to perform my best academically. This is just one example where it’s not merely honoring hunger and fullness. 

3
It’s not just the hunger and fullness diet; there is so much nuance!

Often times, intuitive eating gets the most attention from “honoring hunger and fullness,” which is a huge part of intuitive eating, however; it’s not that simple. There are plenty of instances I can think of within myself, or with my clients in eating disorder and chronic dieting recovery, where you simply don’t get appropriate hunger and fullness cues.

Your body sends amazing signals when it needs nourishment, yet the culture we live in tells us that those innate signals can't be trusted. This can lead to diminished hunger and fullness cues from dieting, skipping meals, or following the bogus rule of no eating after 7 pm. This is where working with a professional to gain back appropriate cues is helpful. 

Sometimes we have to eat when we aren't hungry just for the simple reason that we need energy and nourishment. This can be uncomfortable. For example, before exams and presentations, while I was in school, I had no appetite, but I knew that my brain needed fuel. I practiced the gentle nutrition piece of intuitive eating and ate anyways to perform my best academically. This is just one example where it’s not merely honoring hunger and fullness. 

It’s not just about eating donuts all day.

Another common misconception is that intuitive eating is all about fun food all the time. The truth is that yes, in order to make peace with all foods, there’s often a “honeymoon” phase, if you will, with certain foods that have been off-limits. Those foods are typically deemed “bad” in our culture, so that’s why you might see more photos of those on Instagram to normalize them. After that honeymoon phase, all foods are fair game, and there’s eventually a great balance in the diet of fuel food and fun foods. Fun foods, like donuts, get old after a while when there are no restrictions (mental or physical) around them, so that’s why intuitive eaters have no moral dilemma when presented with a donut. They eat it, or they don’t because they know that donuts are fair game whenever the craving hits. 

4
It’s not just about eating donuts all day.

Another common misconception is that intuitive eating is all about fun food all the time. The truth is that yes, in order to make peace with all foods, there’s often a “honeymoon” phase, if you will, with certain foods that have been off-limits. Those foods are typically deemed “bad” in our culture, so that’s why you might see more photos of those on Instagram to normalize them. After that honeymoon phase, all foods are fair game, and there’s eventually a great balance in the diet of fuel food and fun foods. Fun foods, like donuts, get old after a while when there are no restrictions (mental or physical) around them, so that’s why intuitive eaters have no moral dilemma when presented with a donut. They eat it, or they don’t because they know that donuts are fair game whenever the craving hits. 

It’s a process, and it takes time.

The last big misconception is the notion that you can become an intuitive eater overnight. Tapping back into your body’s innate intuitive nature takes time. Just learning to re-trust my fullness cues took me what I think was about half a year. Finding joy and peace in moving my body took so much longer after years of using exercise as punishment or to manipulate my body shape and size. It takes time to release the mental rules and rigidity around eating. It takes time for your body shape and size to fall at the range that’s right for you. It takes time to appreciate size diversity and maybe even grieve the loss of the body you had when dieting or restricting. This process can take years, and it’s imperative to give yourself a whole lot of self-compassion and grace, because you are surrounded by a culture that tells you dieting is the norm. It’s hard to swim upstream, but I promise you, it’s a lot more peaceful than living in diet culture. 

Feel free to follow and reach out to me on Instagram at @constancelyeating or if you would like to work with me in-person in Denver, or virtually, check out Nourished With Hannah to learn more about Hannah and me! 
 

5
It’s a process, and it takes time.

The last big misconception is the notion that you can become an intuitive eater overnight. Tapping back into your body’s innate intuitive nature takes time. Just learning to re-trust my fullness cues took me what I think was about half a year. Finding joy and peace in moving my body took so much longer after years of using exercise as punishment or to manipulate my body shape and size. It takes time to release the mental rules and rigidity around eating. It takes time for your body shape and size to fall at the range that’s right for you. It takes time to appreciate size diversity and maybe even grieve the loss of the body you had when dieting or restricting. This process can take years, and it’s imperative to give yourself a whole lot of self-compassion and grace, because you are surrounded by a culture that tells you dieting is the norm. It’s hard to swim upstream, but I promise you, it’s a lot more peaceful than living in diet culture. 

Feel free to follow and reach out to me on Instagram at @constancelyeating or if you would like to work with me in-person in Denver, or virtually, check out Nourished With Hannah to learn more about Hannah and me! 
 

Connie Weissmuller MINDBODY
Written by
Connie Weissmuller
Registered Dietitian
About the author
A registered dietitian who loves helping people achieve food and body freedom, Connie specializes in the treatment of eating disorders, intuitive eating, and body image from a Health At Every Size lens. Working with clients to overcome food and body struggles, she is all about giving you the tools you need to find what healthy means to you.