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Further Food collagen
Fitness
Published Monday Feb 11, 2019 by Further Food

Here’s How Collagen Can Supercharge Your Workout

Organizer Prefix
Partnership with
Organizer Name
Further Food
Nutrition
Food
Fitness

We hear about how sippin’ collagen can do wonders for your skin, but what about your workout? Turns out, throwing a scoop into that morning smoothie can actually add to your gym game. Our friends at Further Food share how collagen can supercharge your next sweat session! 
 



 
Whether you’re a triathlete, gym-goer, or yogi, collagen is the perfect recovery protein that helps to build and repair the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage that are stressed during exercise. Collagen is the key component for structural support in our body; it comprises 90% of our connective tissue – this includes our joints, ligaments, tendons, and fascia. The combination of collagen’s high bioavailability with its high amino acid content makes it optimal post-exercise nutrition that rapidly absorbs and can quickly work to help repair and replenish proteins broken down during exercise. Collagen protein supplementation is the key to maintaining an active lifestyle. Learn about collagen protein benefits for athletes, including collagen muscle repair benefits below.

 

Further Food


A Protein That Repairs

Collagen Protein For Muscle Repair and Restoration

Protein loss occurs in muscles during and after long periods of exercise due to oxidation, inflammatory reactions, and muscle microlesions. Research shows that protein synthesis decreases during exercise, then immediately increases after exercise for an extended period of time. A high protein diet post-exercise enables the replacement of lost proteins, restoring the protein content of muscles by increasing muscle anabolism. The high amino acid content of collagen protein makes collagen ideal for muscle repair and recovery. Supplementing with collagen may help muscle repair, making it essential post-workout nutrition.


Collagen Protein May Speed up Injury Recovery Time

Science has identified the body’s two main processes for healing torn or ruptured muscles: regeneration of muscle fibers simultaneously with the production of connective scar tissue. The key to both of these processes is collagen formation. In a study measuring the rates of collagen protein production for three weeks after a muscle rupture, scientists found collagen synthesis rates to be heightened in muscle cells during this time. Type III collagen synthesis reached a maximum during the first week of wound healing and is linked to the development of flexibility/plasticity of the connective tissue. Type 1 collagen formation began later during the healing process and was linked to increasing the strength of the new muscle fibers and connective tissue.


Collagen Protein May Help with Injury Prevention by Strengthening Joints and Ligaments

In a study following three different categories of athletes, supplementation with a combination of collagen peptides, BCAA, and arginine over a two-year period decreased tendon-ligament and joint related injury rates3. Another study that measured effects of daily intake of collagen peptides on the structure of the Achilles tendon found a significant increase in collagen fiber diameter, suggesting improved strength of the tendon as a result of collagen supplementation.   

                                                                
Collagen Protein May Reduce Joint Pain Associated with Sport-Related Injuries

Clinical trials have shown supplementation with collagen may reduce activity and exercise-related joint pain. High impact activities and high-intensity sports exert stress on joints that can lead to pain and injury. In a study among subjects who experienced activity-related joint pain, supplementation with collagen protein for 120 days resulted in improved joint function and flexibility while exercising, and subjects were able to exercise longer before experiencing joint pain.


Collagen Protein That Improves Performance

Collagen is an Ideal Source of Protein and Essential Amino Acids

Collagen protein powder is ideal for post-workout nutrition due to its high amino acid content that supports the body’s protein needs during and after exercise. Further Food Collagen contains 18 amino acids and eight of the nine essential amino acids that cannot be made by the body and must be consumed through dietary proteins.  


Collagen Protein May Improve Athletic Performance

Muscular contraction during exercise is dependent on creatine, a molecule made of three amino acids – glycine, methionine, and arginine. Further Food Collagen contains 20% glycine and 8% arginine, which may support the synthesis of creatine in the body to improve performance during shorts burst of muscle contraction. Science has also linked oral arginine intake to increased athletic performance.  A study showed that oral intake of 1g of arginine and ornithine for five weeks can increase strength by stimulating the release of growth hormone. Two servings of Further Food Collagen provides 1.3 grams of arginine, which supports improved athletic performance.      

  
Review of Collagen Protein Benefits for An Active Lifestyle 


- Collagen protein may help repair and restore muscles
- Collagen supplementation may help to speed up recovery time from injuries
- Collagen protein may help in strengthening joints and ligaments, helping to prevent injuries
- Collagen protein may reduce activity and exercise-related joint pain
- Collagen protein is ideal post-workout nutrition as it contains a high amino acid content
- Further Food Collagen contains glycine and arginine which help support athletic performance


*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Further Food
Written by
Further Food
Contributor
About the author
From the minds of three women with personal experiences in chronic illness, Further Food is a community-built company that creates real food-based supplements to help promote optimal health and wellness. Go further, naturally!
Yoga sleep tips MINDBODY
Wellness
Published Wednesday Sep 18, 2019 by Amber Scriven

4 Yoga Poses for a Better Night’s Sleep

Yoga
Personal Growth
Expert Advice

We’ve all had sleepless nights. It’s the worst! Watching the wee hours of morning tick away. Wishing we could slip into a restful sleep before our alarm goes off . The frustrating feeling of knowing exactly how many minutes there are before you need to be up. Then, struggling through a heavy relentless morning filled with self-medicating coffee runs, and a tired, snappy version of yourself dragging through the day. 

There’s no one miracle cure for insomnia because there are so many reasons for not being able to sleep. Many people, however, find relief by curbing stress right before bed. One way to do that is with a few choice yoga stretches that mellow you out by encouraging your Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) to ignite your bodies “rest and digest” cycles. This is the opposite of the “fight or flight” system that helps you race away from oncoming tigers, or other more urban “dangers.”  

Here are a few shapes that calm the nervous system and decrease adrenaline in the body to help you rest and ultimately sleep better. 
 

Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

1
Legs-Up-the-Wall

This is a super simple way to relax right before bed, or even from the comfort of your bed. Pushing your legs up the wall helps move the lymph and blood out of your feet using gravity, this, in turn, means your heart doesn’t need to work as hard to pump it back up. Thus, things get a little quieter in your cardiovascular system helping to soothe your body into a sense of softness.

Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

2
Supported Bridge (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

This shape uses the same idea as Legs-Up-the-Wall. It calms by inverting your hips above your heart, but it also stretches your neck and chest open for tension relief. The muscles can open and let go of anything they are holding onto. It also opens your lungs and diaphragm, which allows you to breathe more deeply, and that oxygen is a calmant.

Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

3
Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Folding forward in Child’s Pose works a little differently. It still opens the lungs (from the upper back), but it requires you to turn inwards. You could bring your hands by your sides for a more restorative version of the shape, and resting your head to one side or the other is often more comfortable. Alternatively, try resting your forehead on a block or the floor, and use that surface to massage the space between your eyebrows. This triggers an acupressure point between your eyebrows that stimulates the pineal gland to encourage a melatonin response. Melatonin is the hormone our bodies produce when it gets dark that tells us to go to sleep!

Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

4
Reclined Bound Angle (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Use a couple pillows for this one! Pop one under your knees, one under your head or upper back, along your spine, and under your hands.Then, get ready to  fall asleep there. Let everything get heavy and drippy and start to think about that weighted sensation in your feet, slowly bring your attention up your body making each body part heavier and heavier as you go. This is a version of Yoga Nidra Meditation and it is extremely relaxing—but you must go slowly. 


So, there you have it! A few ideas from yoga, science, and acupressure to help you get some much-deserved ZZZ’s. 
 

Amber Scriven Acupuncturist
Written by
Amber Scriven
Acupuncturist | Yoga Teacher
About the author
A busy acupuncturist, yoga teacher and trainer, Amber has actively worked in the wellness industry for over 10 years. For her, yoga is a form of health care that she uses alongside acupuncture in the form of retreats, injury rehabilitation, and pain relief. Amber is renowned for building emotional strength while cultivating physical health.